Video: You Want It Darker Featuring Gideon Zelermyer & Shaar Hashomayim Synagogue Choir – Montréal Symphonique Aug 19, 2017

Featured

 

Mimi Lela shot this video of the Leonard Cohen tribute at the Montréal Symphonique, a concert by Montreal’s three major orchestras (The Montreal Symphony Orchestra, the McGill Symphony Orchestra and the Orchestre Métropolitai) and some of the Canada’s biggest pop artists on Mount Royal. According to Montréal Symphonique rouses crowd of thousands on Mount Royal (CBC News: Aug 19, 2017), the show was viewed by “a crowd of 80,000  and thousands more in parks across the city, where it was projected.”

Also see Video Clip: Rufus Wainwright Singing Leonard Cohen’s Hallelujah At Montréal – Aug 19, 2017

“[Leonard Cohen’s] songs live for their words … There is a dark wit here, too, and an ability to see the world with a tougher, crueler, blunter vision than the rest of us can manage.”

Featured

lc-1988
quoteup2
Mr. Cohen is a true descendant of the talking poet kind of rock singer; I believe he was No. 348 in the certified sequence of 4,012 critically acclaimed ‘new Bob Dylans.’ His songs live for their words, which offer line after line of involving, fascinating images and ideas. His world is that of a defiant middle-aged romantic; this disk [I’m Your Man] is Mr. Cohen’s equivalent of Frank Sinatra’s 1965 album, ‘September of My Years.’ But there is a dark wit here, too, and an ability to see the world with a tougher, crueler, blunter vision than the rest of us can manage.quotedown2


Rock Poets From Canada Roll Anew by John Rockwell. New York Times: April 17, 1988. Originally posted Mar 6, 2013 at DrHGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric

“Leonard Cohen’s gatherings-together are unambiguously about the soul—its terrors, its betrayals, its hesitations, its longing to give itself over.” Pico Iyer

Featured

quoteup2
Leonard Cohen’s gatherings-together are unambiguously about the soul—its terrors, its betrayals, its hesitations, its longing to give itself over. A casual listener notices how often the singer uses the word ‘naked.’ A fledgling Cohenite hears him saying, ‘I need to see you naked in your body and your thought.’ But the person who lives with the songs realizes that what makes the writer special is that he’s not rendering others naked, but himself.quotedown2

Pico Iyer

 

From Leonard Cohen burns, and we burn with him by Pico Iyer. Shambhala Sun: May 2013. Photo by J.S. Carenza III. Originally posted April 3, 2013 at DrHGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric

“I think it’s impossible to get through this veil of tears entirely sober” Leonard Cohen Invokes Baudelairean Strategy

Featured

lc-b

quoteup2
I think it’s impossible to get through this veil of tears entirely sober. I’m more like Baudelaire: let me be drunk with wine, with women, with poetry – whatever the thing is.quotedown2

Leonard Cohen

 

The Baudelaire reference is to his poem, “Enivrez-Vous” (Poem #581) from Petits Poemes en Prose (Little Prose Poems). An English translation follows and is itself followed by the poem in its original French:

Get Drunk! by Charles Baudelaire

Always be drunk.
That’s it!
The great imperative!
In order not to feel
Time’s horrid fardel
bruise your shoulders,
grinding you into the earth,
Get drunk and stay that way. Continue Reading →

“I Made Leonard Cohen Smile, That Just Seriously Made My Life” Cassandra-Cohen Convergence: Regina 2013

Featured

lc-cassandra-biggz-bullis

quoteup2
I just met Leonard Cohen and he is so beautiful and exactly like how he appears to be he’s so nice and adorable and he actually wears that cute hat and when I told him I waited since 10 he apologized for taking so long I said it was ok and …quotedown2

Cassandra Muireann Bullis

 

Cassandra’s own account describes her waiting from 10 AM to 3 PM in hopes of catching sight of the Canadian singer-songwriter and what happened when “The Man himself came out, put on his shades like some cool mobster, saw me and, … ”

I can’t possibly do the story justice and can only recommend you hit the link [Update: Sadly Casandra’s Tumblr is no longer online) to read about Cassandra’s plan to “tackle him or whatever.(I’d do it lightly, ok? Can’t have no broken Leonards)”  should “LC decide to bolt to the car,” her olfactory assessment of him (“He also smells really good”), his embracement technique (“a tight side-hug squeeze”), and more.

Credit Due Department
: Photo by Neil Larsen

Note: Originally posted April 30, 2013 at DrHGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric

“Oh! What It Seemed to Be” Is On Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox

jukebox700

Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox

Biggest Influence on My Music – The jukebox. I lived beside jukeboxes all through the fifties. … I never knew who was singing. I never followed things that way. I still don’t. I wasn’t a student of music; I was a student of the restaurant I was in — and the waitresses. The music was a part of it. I knew what number the song was.

– Leonard Cohen (Yakety Yak by Scott Cohen, 1994)

Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox: Over the years, Leonard Cohen has mentioned a number of specific songs he favors. Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox is a Cohencentric feature that began collecting these tunes for the edification and entertainment of viewers on April 4, 2009. All posts in the Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox series can be found at The Original Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox Page.

Oh! What It Seemed to Be

Tom Chaffin, author of  Conversations From A Room (1993 Leonard Cohen interview), wrutes

Was looking at your Leonard Cohen Jukebox the other day, and thought of a song that he mentioned to me as one of his early favorites. At the time I wasn’t familiar with the song (just remember him reciting first verse or so), so I have no idea of what version he had in mind.

Wikipedia informs us

“Oh! What it Seemed to Be” is a song composed by Bennie Benjamin, George Weiss and Frankie Carle. The song was most popular in 1946, and was taken to number 1 that year by both Frank Sinatra and the Frankie Carle orchestra, the latter with Marjorie Hughes on vocals.

That first verse follows:

It was just a neighborhood dance
That’s all that it was
But, oh, what it seemed to be
It was like a masquerade ball
With costumes and all
Cause you were at the dance with me

Since Leonard was not, for the most part, a Sinatra fan, I’ve chosen the version by the Frankie Carle orchestra for this post.

“Our natural vocabulary is Judaeo-Christian. That is ours. We have to rediscover law from our own heritage.” Leonard Cohen 1968


quoteup2
The best products of our time are in agony. The finest sensibilities of the age are convulsed with pain. That means a change is at hand. People keep saying India, India, India. But the Indian vocabulary is much too precise for us. Our natural vocabulary is Judaeo-Christian. That is ours. We have to rediscover law from our own heritage.quotedown2

Leonard Cohen

 

From Unique Interpreters of Pop: Leonard Cohen by Jacoba Atlas. The Beat: March 9, 1968. Photo from York University Libraries, Clara Thomas Archives & Special Collections, Toronto Telegram fonds, F0433, Photographer: John Sharp, ASC01709. Originally posted February 7, 2013 at DrHGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric

On The 2017 Eclipse Playlist: Leonard Cohen – Night Comes On

nightveronaAnd the night came on
It was very calm
I wanted the night to go on and on
But she said, Go back to the World

It’s Papa, don’t peek, Papa, cover your eyes

Also on the 2017 Eclipse Playlist:

Leonard Cohen – Night Comes On
Verona: Sept 24, 2012
Video by Juraj M. at

Credit Due Department: Photo by Denys – Own work, CC BY 3.0, Wikipedia Commons