Bob Dylan And Leonard Cohen Back Congruent Cologne Concepts

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The Singer-Songwriter Scent Of Success

Lost in the rages of fragrance
– From “The Window” by Leonard Cohen

Ongoing readers will recall the previous post, Indifference: Leonard Cohen’s Cologne Concept, focused on Cohen’s his vision he shared with Sean Dixon, aka Sleep66:

Leonard once told me he was going to come out with his own cologne. It was going to be called “Indifference,” and its slogan was going to be “I don’t give a shit what happens”

That same post also included the Cohencentric ad proposal as a means of furthering this venture.

It turns out that Leonard Cohen is not the only iconic singer-songwriter to consider developing his own line of cologne. The following excerpt is from Carrie Fisher’s book, “Wishful Drinking:”

Dylan wasn’t calling to ask me on a date. He was calling because this cologne company had contacted him to ask if he would endorse a cologne called Just Like A Woman. Now Bob didn’t like that name, but he liked the idea of endorsing a cologne. And he wanted to know if I had any good cologne names.

Do I look like someone who would be wandering around with a bunch of cologne names rattling around in my head?

Well, tragically, I did. I did have quite a few ideas for cologne names and so I told them to Bob.

There was Ambivalence – for the scent of confusion.

Arbitrary – for the man who doesn’t give a shit how he smells!

And, Empathy – feel like them, smell like this.

Well, Bob actually liked those!

The Dylan-Cohen Defecatory Disinterest Dialectic

The reader’s attention is called to the description of “Arbitrary,” the second of Ms Fisher’s designations winning Mr Dylan’s approval. The juxtaposition of that phrase, “for the man who doesn’t give a shit how he smells,” with Mr Cohen’s proposed slogan for his cologne, “I don’t give a shit what happens,” readily identifies the hitherto undiscovered motif employed by both of the men most often acknowledged as the poet- lyricists of their time:

Does Not Give A Shit

The Consequences

The intuitively apparent mythicocloacal significance implicit in this shared theme mandates a re-appraisal of the corpus of work produced by not only each of these artists but also all those performers influenced by them.

It also opens up, of course, a synergistic entrepreneurial opportunity for a combined Cohen-Dylan line of colognes for the discerning kind of man who is governed only by his own insouciance.

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The Cohen-Dylan Interface

All posts about Leonard Cohen’s & Bob Dylan’s opinions of each other, their meetings, and comparisons by others can be found at