Leonard Cohen’s 1967 Album “Songs of Leonard Cohen” Inducted Into The Grammy Hall Of Fame

Songs_of_Leonard_CohenxLeonard Cohen’s 1967 Album “Songs of Leonard Cohen” is one of 27 recordings added into the Hall of Fame, which continues “the tradition of preserving and celebrating timeless recordings” and now totals 987 recordings.1

This excerpt from These Are The 27 Titles Being Inducted Into The Grammy Hall Of Fame by Hugh McIntyre (Forbes: Jan 18, 2015) explains the concept of inducting albums and songs into the Grammy Hall Of Fame:

Unknown to many people, the Grammys give out many different types of awards other than just the traditional golden gramophone we see celebrities accepting on TV. One such honor is the Hall of Fame, where the Recording Academy inducts albums and songs every year. This year, twenty seven new titles are being accepted into the institution’s growing list of famous names.

Like the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, recordings must be at least 25 years old to be eligible, and they must have left a mark on the music industry—though that’s not to say they were all big hits. Titles are nominated and chosen by a special committee tasked specifically with the Hall of Fame. The songs and albums that have already been inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame are on display at the Grammy Museum, which is located in Los Angeles.

Note: Originally posted December 16, 2014 at DrHGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric

_________________________

  1. Source: Records by Sex Pistols, Chic, Neil Young, Lou Reed added to Grammy Hall of Fame by Leonie Cooper (NME: Dec 16, 2014) []

Video: Leonard Cohen Inducted Into The Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame – 2008

hofinduct
quoteup2
We’re so lucky to be alive at the same time Leonard Cohen isquotedown2

Lou Reed – 2008 Rock & Roll
Hall Of Fame Induction

 

Leonard Cohen, Still Classy After All These Years

Leonard Cohen, dapperly dressed in a black tux, thanked Lou Reed for his introduction and acknowledged that his induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame was “such an unlikely event” and “not a distinction that I coveted or even dared dream about.”

In a classic self-effacing moment, Cohen then solemnly observed,

quoteup2
I am reminded of the prophetic statement by Jon Landau in the early 1970s: ‘I have seen the future of rock’n’roll, and it is not Leonard Cohen’1quotedown2

 

Leonard Cohen, who may have been the only speaker, including Jan Werner, Chairman of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and MC for the ceremony, to speak without notes (Lou Reed carried loose papers, a notebook, and a copy of Cohen’s “Book of Longing” to the podium), then recited the lyrics of “Tower of Song” and promptly surrendered the stage to Damien Rice for his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah.”

For more about the 2008 Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame Induction, see Leonard Cohen Inducted Into Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame – 2008

___________________________

  1. Cohen was, of course, riffing on the famous proclamation Jon Landau wrote in 1974 as a Rolling Stone contributing editor, “I’ve seen the future of rock n’ roll, and it’s name is Bruce Springsteen.” Leonard Cohen is too much of a gentleman (thank goodness, I’m not) to point out that within a year or two of that statement, Mr. Landau was Springsteen’s producer and manager – and still on the Rolling Stone masthead. []

Photos: Leonard Cohen Caught In The Act (Of Graciousness) At 2011 Prince Of Asturias Awards

Studies Of The Nape Of An Icon’s Neck

Leonard Cohen was Protocol Breaker #1 at the 2011 Prince Of Asturias Awards, habitually responding graciously to requests to sign a CD, book, brochure, etc., thus wreaking havoc on the carefully constructed organizational timetables.

These evidentiary photos were taken and contributed by the Spanish Cohen Brigade.

Note: Originally posted Dec 19, 2011 at DrHGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric

Video: Leonard Cohen Invokes “La Manic” In 2006 Canadian Songwriters Hall Of Fame Speech

cshfind2ution

Leonard Cohen’s brief acceptance speech at the 2006 Canadian Songwriters Hall Of Fame induction is typically gracious, includes the requisite self-effacing joke, and even offers a rendition of his trademarked phrase, “If I knew where the good songs came from, I’d go there more often.” The high point, however, is his invocation of Georges Dor’s La Manic to close his talk.

Cohen first performed his cover of La Manic at the Nov 29, 2012 Montreal concert.

The video also contains an accolade-laden introduction by former CBC Host, Governor General, and author Adrienne Clarkson and Cohen wiping away tears of gratitude as well as a glimpse of Anjani Thomas (seated by Cohen)

Leonard Cohen Accepting Induction into CSHF 2006, Part II
Video from ljw2909

Note: Originally posted November 8, 2014 at DrHGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric

Video: Las Lágrimas De Un Príncipe [Tears Of A Prince] – Leonard Cohen At The Prince Of Asturias Awards

video-tears

This video comprises memory-evoking photos of Leonard Cohen taken by Eloy Alonso at the 2011 Prince Of Asturias Awards set to the music of “Suzanne.” (Also see The Prince Of Asturias Awards Speech Video With Annotations & Commentary)

Credit Due Department: The image atop this post is a screen capture from the video.

Note: Originally posted Apr 30, 2014 at DrHGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric

“We will be building statues to Cohen in the future. Any acknowledgement of his work at this point in his career is but a token down-payment of the homage that he is due”

Prof. Gregory Betts in the English department at Brock University said. “It would be ridiculous to think that the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame authenticates Leonard Cohen. If anything, it is hoping to gain some credibility by acknowledging him.” Yet, despite the fact that a Canadian literary icon will be included in the constant rotation of songs played at the Hall of Fame, will Cohen’s acceptance have any drastic effects on how Canadian literature is viewed? Professor Marilyn Rose in the English department at Brock has her doubts. “I’m not sure that Leonard Cohen’s induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame will change much about the profile of Canadian literature abroad,” she said. “Cohen is being honoured for his songwriting. His public persona is as a pop icon at this point, more than anything else. And in that role he is associated as much with Los Angeles and New York as with Montreal, where he grew up.” Betts echoes these sentiments, but also believes that Cohen being recognized as a ‘song writer’ will simply distract from the fact that he does have such a vast catalogue of poetry and two cutting edge novels attributed to his name, which deserve just as much recognition, if not more, than his ‘popular singer/songwriter’ status.

From We May Be Ugly, But We Have The Music [Update: no longer online] by Katherine Gottli. Brock Press: March 18, 2008, a discussion of the impact of Leonard Cohen’s induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame vis-à-vis his influence on Canadian literature.

Note: Originally posted February 12, 2013 at DrHGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric