Iggy Pop Compares Leonard Cohen’s Concerts To Stooges’ & Responds To Dylan’s Assessment Of “I Wanna Be Your Dog”

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The Stooges & Iggy Pop, Poland, Katowice Off Festival – 2012

Did you catch any of Leonard Cohen’s recent shows?

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No, it was terrible, because the Stooges European tour was three days behind him everywhere we went. We’d get to town and they’d say, ‘Leonard Cohen was fantastic and sensitive, and played for three hours!’ I’d say, ‘Well, we’re the Stooges, our typical song has 11 words, and after an hour and a quarter you’ll want us to leave!’quotedown2

Iggy Pop

 

Ever hang out with Dylan?

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Once, at a dinner at Yoko’s, and again at a birthday party at Bob’s place in Malibu. Don Was and Leonard Cohen dragged me out there. Bob was a good guy. I haven’t heard it myself, but I heard on a ‘dog’-themed segment on his radio show he actually played ‘I Wanna Be Your Dog.’ [Imitating Dylan] ‘Here’s one of the best dog songs ever written…’ That made my life, dude.quotedown2

Iggy Pop

From Q&A: Iggy Pop by Austin Scaggs (Rolling Stone: April 10, 2010)

Credit Due Department: Photo by Regan1973 – Own work, GFDL, via Wikipedia

Note: Originally posted February 8, 2013 at DrHGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric

“I discovered Leonard Cohen, who had a literary approach to lyrics.” Kazuo Ishiguro On Leonard Cohen & Bob Dylan

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Excerpted from Kazuo Ishiguro, The Art of Fiction No. 196, interviewed by Susannah Hunnewell. Paris Review Spring 2008 No. 184

INTERVIEWER

What was your next obsession, after detective stories?

ISHIGURO

Rock music. After Sherlock Holmes, I stopped reading until my early twenties. But I’d played the piano since I was five. I started playing the guitar when I was fifteen, and I started listening to pop records—pretty awful pop records—when I was about eleven. I thought they were wonderful. The first record that I really liked was Tom Jones singing “The Green, Green Grass of Home.” Tom Jones is a Welshman, but “The Green, Green Grass of Home” is a cowboy song. He was singing songs about the cowboy world I knew from TV.

I had a miniature Sony reel-to-reel that my father brought me from Japan, and I would tape directly from the speaker of the radio, an early form of downloading music. I would try to work out the words from this very bad recording with buzzes. Then when I was thirteen, I bought John Wesley Harding, which was my first Dylan album, right when it came out.

INTERVIEWER

What did you like about it?

ISHIGURO

The words. Bob Dylan was a great lyricist, I knew that straightaway. Two things that I was always confident about, even in those days, were what was a good lyric and what was a good cowboy film. With Dylan, I suppose it was my first contact with stream-of-consciousness or surreal lyrics. And I discovered Leonard Cohen, who had a literary approach to lyrics. He had published two novels and a few volumes of poetry. For a Jewish guy, his imagery was very Catholic. Lot of saints and Madonnas. He was like a French chanteur. I liked the idea that a musician could be utterly self-sufficient. You write the songs yourself, sing them yourself, orchestrate them yourself. I found this appealing, and I began to write songs.

INTERVIEWER

What was your first song?

ISHIGURO

It was like a Leonard Cohen song. I think the opening line was, “Will your eyes never reopen, on the shore where we once lived and played.”

INTERVIEWER

Was it a love song?

ISHIGURO

Part of the appeal of Dylan and Cohen was that you didn’t know what the songs were about. You’re struggling to express yourself, but you’re always being confronted with things you don’t fully understand and you have to pretend to understand them. That’s what life is like a lot of the time when you’re young, and you’re ashamed to admit it. Somehow, their lyrics seem to embody this state.

Note: Originally posted Sep 24, 2013 at DrHGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric

Leonard Cohen Lauds Bob Dylan’s “lines that have the feel of unhewn stone”

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At a certain point, when the Jews were first commanded to raise an altar, the commandment was on unhewn stone. Apparently, the god that wanted that particular altar didn’t want slick, didn’t want smooth. He wanted an unhewn stone placed on another unhewn stone. Maybe you then go looking for stones that fit … Now I think that Dylan has lines, hundreds of great lines, that have the feel of unhewn stone. But they really fit in there. But they’re not smoothed out. It’s inspired but not polished. That is not to say he doesn’t have lyrics of great polish. That kind of genius can manifest all the forms and all the styles.quotedown2

Leonard Cohen

From Leonard Cohen, Paul Simon and more on Bob Dylan by Paul Zello (American Songwriter: Feb 14, 2012). All posts about Leonard Cohen’s & Bob Dylan’s opinions of each other, their meetings, and comparisons by others can be found at . Originally posted December 30, 2014at DrHGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric

Bob Dylan’s “Brownsville Girl” Is On Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox

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Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox

Biggest Influence on My Music – The jukebox. I lived beside jukeboxes all through the fifties. … I never knew who was singing. I never followed things that way. I still don’t. I wasn’t a student of music; I was a student of the restaurant I was in — and the waitresses. The music was a part of it. I knew what number the song was.

– Leonard Cohen (Yakety Yak by Scott Cohen, 1994)

Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox: Over the years, Leonard Cohen has mentioned a number of specific songs he favors. Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox is a Cohencentric feature that began collecting these tunes for the edification and entertainment of viewers on April 4, 2009. All posts in the Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox series can be found at The Original Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox Page.

Another Bob Dylan Hit On Leonard Cohen’s Playlist

knockout_lDylan’s “Brownsville Girl,” #3 on Leonard Cohen’s Top Ten Songs of 1988,1 joins “I And I” and “Tangled Up In Blue” on the list of songs specifically praised by Cohen.

Released in 1986 as a track on Bob Dylan’s “Knocked Out Loaded” album, “Brownsville Girl” (originally named “New Danville Girl”) was co-written by playwright Sam Shepard. Dylan performed it only once in concert, on August 6, 1986.2

Bob Dylan – Brownsville Girl

Bob Dylan Songs On Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox

Leonard Cohen-Bob Dylan Interface

All posts about Leonard Cohen’s & Bob Dylan’s opinions of each other, their meetings, and comparisons by others can be found at

Note: Originally posted June 27, 2010 at 1HeckOfAGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric
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  1. From Leonard Cohen – In Eigenen Worten (in his own words) by Jim Devlin, a listing found by Florian at LeonardCohenForum []
  2. Wikipedia []

Leonard Cohen Upon Being Asked If He Followed “Bob Dylan’s Credo, ‘Just because you like my music doesn’t mean I owe you anything'”

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I feel the exact opposite. These people created my life. It’s a modest one, but I’ve been able to live and send my kids to school and lead this charmed and lucky existence. At least, that’s the cover story – I’m not talking about my own inner turmoil. I was never a punk, you know? It isn’t my style to be ungrateful to people who buy my records and come to my concerts.quotedown2

Leonard Cohen

 

Leonard Cohen, responding to the interviewer’s query, “So you don’t follow Bob Dylan’s credo,’Just because you like my music doesn’t mean I owe you anything’?” in Leonard Cohen by Neva Chonin (Rolling Stone: December 11, 1997)

Note: Originally posted Dec 28, 2014 at DrHGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric

Bob Dylan’s “Tangled Up In Blue” Is On Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox

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Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox

Biggest Influence on My Music – The jukebox. I lived beside jukeboxes all through the fifties. … I never knew who was singing. I never followed things that way. I still don’t. I wasn’t a student of music; I was a student of the restaurant I was in — and the waitresses. The music was a part of it. I knew what number the song was.

– Leonard Cohen (Yakety Yak by Scott Cohen, 1994)

Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox: Over the years, Leonard Cohen has mentioned a number of specific songs he favors. Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox is a Cohencentric feature that began collecting these tunes for the edification and entertainment of viewers on April 4, 2009. All posts in the Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox series can be found at The Original Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox Page.

Bob Dylan Returns To Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox

 

blood

Already represented by “I And I” on the list of songs praised by Leonard Cohen,1 Bob Dylan scores again with “Tangled Up In Blue,” which was released in 1975 on Dylan’s Blood On The Tracks album,  “Tangled Up In Blue” was ranked #2 in the list of Leonard Cohen’s favorite songs in 1985.2

Interestingly, as a side note, Cohen’s one-time paramour, Joni Mitchell,3 is also associated with this song. According to Ron Rosenbaum, writing in The Best Joni Mitchell Song Ever (Slate, Dec. 14, 2007),

Bob Dylan once told me that he’d written “Tangled up in Blue,” the opening song of the much-celebrated Blood on the Tracks, after spending a weekend immersed in JM’s Blue (although I think he may have been talking about the whole album, not just the song).

Bob Dylan – Tangled Up In Blue
From the film, Renaldo and Clara

Bob Dylan Songs On Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox

Leonard Cohen-Bob Dylan Interface

All posts about Leonard Cohen’s & Bob Dylan’s opinions of each other, their meetings, and comparisons by others can be found at

Note: Originally posted Apr 27, 2010 at 1HeckOfAGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric

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  1. See Bob Dylan’s “I And I” Is On Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox []
  2. From Leonard Cohen – In Eigenen Worten (in his own words) by Jim Devlin, a listing found by Florian at LeonardCohenForum []
  3. See Leonard Cohen and Joni Mitchell: Just One Of Those Things []