“I tried all the conventional remedies [for depression] – wine, women and song. Nothing worked, including religion” Leonard Cohen On The Resolution Of His Clinical Depression

quoteup2
For me, [the retreat at Mount Baldy Zen Center] was one of the many attempts I’ve made in the past thirty or forty years to address a condition known as acute clinical depression. I tried all the conventional remedies – wine, women and song. Nothing worked, including religion. But fortunately, this condition dissolved. [Interviewer: With being on the mountain?] I don’t know. I don’t know how it began or how it ended, but, thankfully, it did end. Nothing worked for me. Not the recreational drugs, nor the obsessional drugs, nor the pharmaceutical medications. The only effect Prozac had on me, I confused with a spiritual achievement – I thought I’d transcended my interest in women. I later learned the destruction of the libido is one of the side effects. But it’s a mysterious conclusion, because I really don’t know what happened. I read somewhere that as you get older, the brain cells associated with anxiety begin to die. [Pauses] A lot of other brain cells die, too, so you’ve got to watch out.quotedown2

Leonard Cohen

From Leonard Cohen on Becoming a Monk, Why His Opinions Don’t Matter by Mark Binelli. Rolling Stone: Nov 8, 2001.

More about Leonard Cohen’s depression can be found at .  All Cohencentric posts on this issue are collected at .

“I always had a background of distress, ever since I was young.” Leonard Cohen On His Depression

quoteup2
I always had a background of distress, ever since I was young. What part that played in becoming a writer or a singer or whatever it was that one became, I don’t know. I didn’t have a sense of an operational ease. [Interviewer: About life?] Just about one’s work or one’s capacity to earn a living; a capacity to find a mate or find a moment of relief in someone’s arms.quotedown2

Leonard Cohen

From Life Of A Ladies’ Man by Sarah Hampson. Globe and Mail: May. 25 2007. Photo by Cory Doctorow from London. CC BY-SA 2.0, via Wikipedia Commons

Also see Leonard Cohen’s Depression, Its (Failed) Medical Treatment, & Its Resolution

Leonard Cohen on His Depression: Cyclicity, Neurotransmitters, Why Encouragement Doesn’t Help …


From An Interview With Leonard Cohen by Rob O’Connor (Downtown, Feb 12, 1992). This article was contributed by Dominique BOILE. Originally posted Aug 6, 2012 at 1HeckOfAGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric

More About Leonard Cohen’s Depression

All posts dealing with Leonard Cohen’s depression are collected . A summary can be read at Leonard Cohen’s Depression, Its (Failed) Medical Treatment, & Its Resolution

Leonard Cohen On The Effect Of Depression On His Creative Work “It’s anguish. It’s a pain in the ass…”

quoteup2
I don’t feel it [the depression] was necessarily the engine of the activity. It’s anguish. It’s a pain in the ass. On the contrary, I find my capacity to concentrate enhanced without that background of horror.quotedown2

Leonard Cohen

The Prince of Prurience and Loss by John Leland, GQ: Nov 2001.

A summary of information about Leonard Cohen’s depression can be found at Leonard Cohen’s Depression, Its (Failed) Medical Treatment, & Its Resolution. All posts about Leonard’s depression are collected at ,

Leonard Cohen on writing songs after his depression lifted: “The work isn’t easier. You know, lifting boulders isn’t easier when you’re in a good mood.”

State of Grace by Doug Saunders. Globe and Mail: Sept 1, 2001. Originally posted June 17, 2014 at DrHGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric

“One dare not complain — except in a good, sad song” Leonard Cohen

gj2
quoteup2
How could I dare to complain [about my life]? Because I think the appropriate and legitimate response would have been, ‘What have you got to complain about?’ When you recognize that you’re living in this incredibly privileged, tiny pocket of mankind, where there is the luxury to discuss these questions, one dare not complain — except in a good, sad songquotedown2

Leonard Cohen

From Angst & Aquavit by Brendan Bernhard. LA Weekly: September 26, 2001. Photo by Gabriel Jones. Originally posted Jun 4, 2014 at DrHGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric