Leonard Cohen Video Of The Day: End Of 2012 Montreal Concert Compilation

1

This video is an honorary member of , the informal Cohencentric series based on the  realization that some Leonard Cohen concert photos taken from the cheap seats more than compensate for the lack of closeup shots with intriguing angles and perspectives hidden to those photographing the show from directly in front of the stage. In this case, however. the obstacle is not bad seats but the video police. The videographer, cohenadmirer1, explains

I was told not to film but got some rough video towards the end of the concert.  Here it is. Includes Going Home … First We Take Manhattan…Closing Time …. I Tried To Leave You.

The result is a video salmagundi of action taking place in the audience as well as on the stage and telescreens with abrupt visual and audio cuts, distorted views, jumbled images, … Featured alongside the performances are such delights as an audience member intently videotaping the show while singing along, drummer Rafael Bernardo Gayol blowing a kiss and not blowing the drumstick toss and catch, closeup guitar picking, and – yep – much more. (See the gallery of screenshots below)

And, it’s great, capturing the excitement, tension, joyfulness, and ambivalence that mark the end of a Leonard Cohen concert.

Leonard Cohen In Concert
Montreal: Nov 29, 2012
Video by cohenadmirer1

Note: Originally posted Feb 16, 2013 at 1HeckOfAGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric

The Multiple (And Confusing) Recording Formats & Promotions Of Leonard Cohen’s 1988 I’m Your Man

Leonard Cohen Ad Reflects Competing Recording Formats & Diffuse Promotion Strategy

When I couldn’t determine the product that was being promoted by the advertisement from New Musical Express (January 30, 1988) shown below, I asked Dominique BOILE, who had contributed the ad. What I learned comprises today’s post.

My confusion arose from the mix of recordings listed on the ad: “First We Take Manhattan,” “Bird On The Wire,” “Sisters Of Mercy,” and “Suzanne.” The only commonality I could see was that all those were tracks on the Best of Leonard Cohen album, but that came out in 1975 so New Musical Express wouldn’t be carrying an ad for that in 1988. And I had no clue about the multiplicity of formats listed.

In his response, Dominique directed me to two reference numbers, one of either side of “CBS” at the bottom of the ad:651352 7 and 65132 6 (note: this second number is a misprint on the original ad; the correct reference number is 651352 6).

Then, he explained that the ad was promoting Leonard Cohen’s “I’m Your Man” album that would be released in February 1988 by pushing CBS 651352 7, aka the 7″ vinyl version of “First We Take Manhattan” taken from the forthcoming LP / Cassette / CD  “I’m Your Man.”

Continue Reading →

“I feel most comfortable when I think of myself as the leader of a government-in-exile…It gives me a position that I can work from.” Leonard Cohen

firstweta
quoteup2
I feel most comfortable when I think of myself as the leader of a government-in-exile. Sometimes I like to think of myself that way. It gives me a position that I can work from. It is not whether I take it seriously or not seriously, we are not speaking about a rational operation. It is just that one feels that one can embody the unspoken aspirations of both oneself and the people you know as somebody who takes responsibility for the predicament, and presents not a solution but an approach. That leads you to some interesting kinds of positions.quotedown2

Leonard Cohen

 

Leonard Cohen, Personal Interview with Winfried Siemerling. 2 November 1990, North York. Unpublished. Quoted in Interior Landscapes and the Public Realm: Contingent Mediations in a Speech and a Song by Leonard Cohen by Winfried Siemerling. Canadian Poetry: No. 33, Fall/Winter, 1993. Originally posted May 22, 2014 at DrHGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric

So Long, R.E.M. – Leonard Cohen & R.E.M.

It’s The End Of R.E.M.

Last week [at time of original posting: Sept 28, 2011], the members of R.E.M. posted this notice on their official site,

To our Fans and Friends: As R.E.M., and as lifelong friends and co-conspirators, we have decided to call it a day as a band. We walk away with a great sense of gratitude, of finality, and of astonishment at all we have accomplished. To anyone who ever felt touched by our music, our deepest thanks for listening.

R.E.M.

R.E.M. has long admired and sometimes emulated Leonard Cohen. On the occasion of  the band’s breakup, a retrospective look at the Leonard Cohen-R.E.M. connection seems an appropriate tribute to this groundbreaking group credited by many as the inventors of alternative rock.

R.E.M.’s Hope = Leonard Cohen’s Suzanne

The link between “Hope” by R.E.M. and “Suzanne” by Leonard Cohen is intriguing because the melody of both songs is nearly identical and the lyrics, while dealing with dissimilar topics, are largely parallel.  In addition, the lyrics of “Hope” have also been lauded  by fans and reviewers as some of Michael Stipe’s strongest work.

According to Wikipedia,

The band R.E.M. gave Cohen a joint songwriting credit for their song “Hope” (on their 1998 album Up), in light of the similarity between the two songs. R.E.M. describe themselves as realising that similarity only after completing the song.

From Ask Michael Stipe: Finale!, posted September 28, 2008:

[Fan:] One of my favorite REM-songs is HOPE, because I really love the background sound, as well as the energy it transports and the rate. The lyrics are great, I especially love the line ” and you want to cross your DNA with something reptile”, so what is the song about and what was the idea about this special line? …

[Michael Stipe:] felt very futuristic/21st c. to me that someday we will use prehistoric ‘living fossil’ animal dna to bolster our own immunity; the guy in the song is facing some very difficult questions about longevity and survival, and basically grabbing at any possibility to stay alive. I obviously lifted most of the song from Leonard Cohen, along with the imagery ideas from World Leader Pretend

For a convenient comparison of the two songs, a video of R.E.M. performing “Hope” and Albert Noonan’s video of Cohen singing “Suzanne” at the November 12, 2009 Las Vegas concert are provided below.

R.E.M. – Hope: Video

Continue Reading →

Leonard Cohen On The Significance Of Who Sent The Monkey And The Plywood Violin In First We Take Manhattan

first 900

I thank you for those items that you sent me,
the monkey and the plywood violin.
I practiced every night, now I’m ready.
First we take Manhattan, then we take Berlin.

From First We Take Manhattan by Leonard Cohen

quoteup2
[The sender of the monkey and the plywood violin is] that part of ourselves that diminished that voice that . . . was demanding a spiritual aspect to our lives . . . . We gave that aspect of ourselves that was hungry some kind of perverse and obscene charity. We made him into an organ grinder . . . . We gave that part of us a monkey and a plywood violin, so that it would screech away and amuse us with its anticsquotedown2

Leonard Cohen

Leonard Cohen, Personal Interview with Winfried Siemerling. 2 November 1990, North York. Unpublished. Quoted in Interior Landscapes and the Public Realm: Contingent Mediations in a Speech and a Song by Leonard Cohen by Winfried Siemerling. Canadian Poetry: No. 33, Fall/Winter, 1993. Originally posted Mar 22, 2014 at DrHGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric