“Legacy? I never thought that it would mean anything to me when I’m dead. I’m going to be busy.” Leonard Cohen 2009

Leonard Cohen reborn in the U.S.A. by Geoff Boucher at Pop & Hiss, the  L.A. Times music blog: February 27, 2009. Photo taken at the July 31, 2009 Leonard Cohen concert in León  by Indiana Caba. Originally posted November 11, 2014 at DrHGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric

Leonard Cohen’s Less Famous Plastic Raincoat

 

Excerpt from For Cohen, Grief Is Joy by Lynn Van Matre (Chicago Tribune: Nov 23, 1975). Thanks to Rike, who discovered and contributed the article. Note: The raincoat pictured is, as they say, an “artist’s vision” of Leonard’s plastic raincoat.

Note: OK, Leonard’s purchase of a cheap plastic raincoat as a joke doesn’t qualify as Essence Of Leonard Cohen stuff, but I am taken by the notion of Leonard covering herself in the same material my mother employed to protect her living room sofa.

“I am interested in my internal landscape and just paint pictures of it” Leonard Cohen


Q: Do you think your lyrics and way of life add to the Cohen mystique?

quoteup2
I think you do have to be in contact with yourself or be interested in establishing contact with yourself. A lot of people aren’t interested in their higher state. It just happens that I am interested in my internal landscape and just paint pictures of it.quotedown2

Leonard Cohen

From The Sounds Interview 1971 by Billy Walker. Sounds: October 23, 1971. Originally posted July 1, 2013 at DrHGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric

“I tried all the conventional remedies [for depression] – wine, women and song. Nothing worked, including religion” Leonard Cohen On The Resolution Of His Clinical Depression

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For me, [the retreat at Mount Baldy Zen Center] was one of the many attempts I’ve made in the past thirty or forty years to address a condition known as acute clinical depression. I tried all the conventional remedies – wine, women and song. Nothing worked, including religion. But fortunately, this condition dissolved. [Interviewer: With being on the mountain?] I don’t know. I don’t know how it began or how it ended, but, thankfully, it did end. Nothing worked for me. Not the recreational drugs, nor the obsessional drugs, nor the pharmaceutical medications. The only effect Prozac had on me, I confused with a spiritual achievement – I thought I’d transcended my interest in women. I later learned the destruction of the libido is one of the side effects. But it’s a mysterious conclusion, because I really don’t know what happened. I read somewhere that as you get older, the brain cells associated with anxiety begin to die. [Pauses] A lot of other brain cells die, too, so you’ve got to watch out.quotedown2

Leonard Cohen

From Leonard Cohen on Becoming a Monk, Why His Opinions Don’t Matter by Mark Binelli. Rolling Stone: Nov 8, 2001.

More about Leonard Cohen’s depression can be found at .  All Cohencentric posts on this issue are collected at .

“I have some work to do in the world and I try to do it the best I can; if I can find a public that is receptive to it, I’m happy. And if I can’t, then I’ll still continue doing it.” Leonard Cohen

From The Song Of Leonard Cohen by Harry Rasky (while the documentary itself was produced in 1980, Leonard Cohen made that statement during the 1979 Field Commander Cohen Tour that was the subject matter of Rasky’s film).

“I’ve always felt a kind of kinship with rock” Leonard Cohen On His Relationship To Rock Music

What’s your relationship to rock music?

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I’ve always felt a kind of kinship with rock. Personally, I’ve lived that life more than any other, so my friends are in it. I’m probably more of a classical musician, but rock ‘n roll has been my cultural avenue. quotedown2

Leonard Cohen

 

From Rebirth Of A Ladies’ Man by Steven Blush. Seconds No 22: June/July 1993. The image atop this post is the cover of Rock & Folk No. 131, Dec 1977 (illustration by Dominique Lechaud) from the private collection of Dominique BOILE.