Sylvie Simmons on Leonard Cohen at SHED: Healdsburg, CA March 2, 2017

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Healdsburg Literary Guild, SHED, Levin & Co, Booksellers and Medlock Ames present Sylvie Simmons

From Healdsburg Literary Guild official press release

British author/rock journalist/recording artist, Sylvie Simmons will tell tales from the dark yet brilliant path of Leonard Cohen at SHED, 25 North Street, Healdsburg, March 2, 2017, 7-8:30. She will read from NY Times Bestselling biography, I’m Your Man: The Life of Leonard Cohen, and sing some Leonard Cohen songs, accompanying herself as she has on tours all around the world on her ukulele.

Enjoy Sylvie, and get tastes of Medlock Ames wines, have some of the special bites prepared by SHED chef Perry Hoffman. You have a chance to buy Sylvie’s books thanks to Levin & Co Booksellers. All this for $15.  More information and tickets can be accessed at Luminarias Features Rock Journalist Sylvie Simmons

Sylvie’s seven-year odyssey researching and writing the Cohen biography resulted in a magnificent book that garnered serious critical acclaim, international fame and “Best Biography of the Year” award from NPR’s All Things Considered. Long a journalist, Sylvie is also a singer songwriter as well as the author of biographies of Serge Gainsbourg and Neil Young as well as fiction and poetry.

Now In Turkish: I’m Your Man: The Life of Leonard Cohen by Sylvie Simmons

turkInformation (in Turkish) about the Turkish edition of I’m Your Man: The Life of Leonard Cohen by Sylvie Simmons can be found at Leonard Cohen’in Hayatı

Editions in Czech and Korean should also be released soon.

“Your relaxed mind is careful, but it does not hit the demon from its own discomfort”

Just for grins, Sylvie processed her own prologue, rendered in Turkish. back into English via Google Translate. Our favorite lines of the result follow:

He is a polite man, he has the attitude of the old and graceful … Leaning greetings while getting acquainted, getting up on your feet. Your relaxed mind is careful, but it does not hit the demon from its own discomfort.

Listen To Sylvie Simmons Talk About “Leonard Cohen’s Poetry, Music & Sexual Exploits” – Catskill Review Of Books

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Leonard Cohen’s Poetry, Music & Sexual Exploits
Sylvie Simmons: Author of “I’m Your Man: The Life Of Leonard Cohen”
Catskill Review Of Books At Syndicatednews.Net
Ian Williams, Host (Dec 9, 2012)

Credit Due Department: Photo by Lynette van Duyn Originally posted Dec 10, 2012 at DrHGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric

Leonard Cohen on His 2008 Tour: “It didn’t look like it was going to pan out very well” – From Leonard Cohen Master of Song by Sylvie Simmons

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Leonard Cohen’s Reluctance To Begin The 2008 Tour

Graciously acceding to my request, Sylvie Simmons offers an excerpt from her forthcoming 5000 word essay on Leonard Cohen that will appear in The next issue of MOJO (#279), which should be in the hands of subscribers and on newsstands the end of Dec 2016 or early Jan 2017.

“It’s hard to separate the feelings at the beginning of the [2008]  tour”, said Leonard. “Reluctance of course. The difficulty of assembling the band, especially when you haven’t done it for almost fifteen years, and in those early periods of assembling the band I guess I felt some reluctance that I had started the whole process, because it didn’t look like it was going to pan out very well. There was a great anxiety about whether we had a show. And my voice”, he laughed. “Well my voice was the least of my worries. I’ve never thought of my voice as a fine or a delicate instrument; I’ve never thought of myself as a singer.” But finally he said he was ready.

Sneak Preview From “Leonard Cohen Master Of Song” By Sylvie Simmons – MOJO #279

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“The Life Of Leonard Cohen Was A Series Of Radical Departures”

Graciously acceding to my request, Sylvie Simmons provides an excerpt from her forthcoming 5000 word essay on Leonard Cohen that will appear in The next issue of MOJO (#279), which should be in the hands of subscribers and on newsstands the end of Dec 2016 or early Jan 2017.

“I was always going off the deep end”, said Cohen, smiling. “So it was no radical departure.” True, when you think about it, the life of Leonard Cohen was a series of radical departures.

Cohen was 33 when his debut album came out. Another radical departure, this being when you weren’t to trust anyone over thirty. Like his poems, his lyrics were sophisticated and dense. Although he had consumed copious amounts of acid and speed, his songs showed no evidence of either. His songs were like nothing else being made in the late 60s, he was unique, at the same time ancient and fresh. John Hammond had a hard time getting Columbia to sign an “old poet”. 

From the outset, Cohen’s relationship with the music business had ranged from dismal to conflicted.