“Everybody leads a spiritual life…” Leonard Cohen


quoteup2
I think that everybody leads a spiritual life. I don’t know if it’s even worthwhile to designate it as that way Everybody is in touch with there own resources, with their own deep pools of divine activity, otherwise they wouldn’t be here on this plane – they’d evaporate. I mean everybody is living a so called religious life, everybody lives a so called spiritual life, everybody is in touch with these powers otherwise they wouldn’t be around. quotedown2

Leonard Cohen

 

How The Heart Approaches What It Yearns – Interview With Leonard Cohen Presented By John McKenna. RTE Ireland, May 9 & 12, 1988. Originally posted Nov 15, 2013 at DrHGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric

Leonard Cohen on the Crucifixion: “It will have to be discovered cause that’s where man is at. On the cross…”

quoteup2
Our natural vocabulary is Judaeo-Christian. That is our blood myth…We have to rediscover the crucifixion. The crucifixion will again be understood as a universal symbol not just as an experiment in sadism or masochism or arrogance. It will have to be discovered cause that’s where man is at. On the cross.quotedown2

Leonard Cohen

From ‘I’ve Been on the Outlaw Scene Since 15’; Leonard Cohen by William Kloman. New York Times: January 28, 1968. Photo: York University Libraries, Clara Thomas Archives & Special Collections, Toronto Telegram fonds, F0433, Photographer: John Sharp. ASC01708. Originally posted January 24, 2011 at DrHGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric

“I think it is a moral universe. I think we are punished for our…sins. I think we are granted grace for…less serious violations.” Leonard Cohen

imgLC026_bewerkt-1-900

From Love Me, Love My Gun Barrel by Graham Lock. New Musical Express: February 23, 1980. Photo By Pete Purnell. Originally posted June 24, 2013 at DrHGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric

Leonard Cohen On The Value Of “A Reference Always Beyond The Activity”

Q: Do you hold as strongly as you once did views about the importance of ceremony in everyday life?

LC: I think that whether we call them ceremonies or not people fall into patterns of greeting one another, of experiencing phenomena. My feeling is that there are certain patterns that have been developed and discerned to be extremely nourishing. It seems to be a waste to discard them. There are some of them from our traditions that I think are very worthwhile.

Q: Of the religious sort?

quoteup2
In a real religious life, such as I don’t lead but have led from time to time, there is a vision for everything that comes up. For instance, in the orthodox Jewish tradition, there’s a blessing for everything: when you see a rainbow, when you meet a wise man, when you meet a stupid man, when you hear bad news. They all start off, ‘Blessed are Thou, King of the Universe, the True Judge…’ In other words, we can’t determine where bad news fits in. When you see someone who’s very beautiful, or who’s deformed, it’s the same blessing. It’s ‘Blessed are Thou, King of the Universe, who varied the appearance of this creature…’ I’m not saying that everyone should learn the blessings, but that kind of approach to things, where there is a reference always beyond the activity, is a perspective I think is very valuable. Most of our ceremonies, the ones we develop ourselves, usually out of cowardice, ambition, or just mean-spiritedness, all have that.quotedown2

Leonard Cohen

 

From Leonard Cohen interview by Doug Fetherling in Books in Canada: Vol. 13, no 7, August/September 1984. Photo “Leonard Cohen, 1988 01” by GorupdebesanezOwn work. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Commons. Originally posted April 25, 2014 at DrHGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric

Leonard Cohen On His Experience As A Zen Monk “The first and most discernible lesson is to stop whining…”

quoteup2
The first and most discernible lesson is to stop whining. And I don’t really need to go much beyond that. It was sort of like boot camp. It’s a rigorous life, it’s cold and it’s above the snow line. Four-thousand feet was the snow line, and we were up around 7,500 feet. A lot of it is involved in surviving the winter. There’s a lot of shoveling of snow. There is very little private space. There’s a saying in Zen: ‘Like pebbles in bag, the monks polish one another.’ Those rough edges get smoothed out.quotedown2

Leonard Cohen

Leonard Cohen reborn in the U.S.A. by Geoff Boucher (L.A. Times Pop & Hiss: February 27, 2009)

“My teacher’s [Roshi’s] school places much emphasis on work and ordinary life, and is very structured, severe and strict. What happens is that you stop thinking about yourself. It worked for me.” Leonard Cohen


quoteup2
My teacher’s school places much emphasis on work and ordinary life, and is very structured, severe and strict. What happens is that you stop thinking about yourself. It worked for me. I never really understood the Zen philosophy. What kept me coming back was my friendship with Roshi. Like all great teachers, he accommodates all students who come to him. Some seek a teacher, others discipline. I needed a friend and he gave me a great deal of affection. He did not try to give me spiritual instruction, but a solution to the pressures of my life, and it didn’t matter to me if it passed for religion, the kitchen or philosophy.quotedown2

Leonard Cohen

 

From An Intimate Conversation With…Leonard Cohen by Elena Pita. Translated by Marie Mazur (using translation software) and aided by Guadalupe Baquero. Originally posted in Spanish at Magazine, Sunday Supplement to El Mundo: September 26, 2001.

Note: Originally posted June 13, 2013 at DrHGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric