“Thank you, music lovers” Leonard Cohen Performs Tower Of Song – Denver 2012

Leonard Cohen – Tower Of Song
Denver: Nov 3, 2012
Video by

Note: There is a short visual interruption near the first when an audience member is seated in front of the camera but this resolves quickly and the remainder of the video is clear of such distractions. “Thank you, music lovers” is Mr Cohen’s acknowledgement for the applause following his keyboard solo. The end of the song features a sweetly extended “Do Dum Dum Dum, De Do Dum Dum” refrain sung by the backup singers while Leonard pleads “Don’t stop.”

“It’s impossible to understand the ’60s culture without addressing the question of lysergic and the position it played right through the decade. It was an element of my creative endeavours at the time, but I don’t believe it was in any way a decisive factor.” Leonard Cohen

From Read Leonard Cohen’s exclusive interview with Hot Press from 1988 by Joe Jackson (Hot Press: 11 Nov 2016). The photograph atop this post, taken by Bill Dampier, is credited to York University Libraries, Clara Thomas Archives & Special Collections, Toronto Telegram fonds, F0433, ASC26833.

Emily Bindiger’s Leonard Cohen Headstand Story Was Classic – Now It’s Classics Illustrated


In the Emily Bindiger Q&A first posted June 8, 2012, one of the stories about life on tour with Leonard Cohen recounted by Emily Bindiger (Emily is best known to Cohencentric readers as Leonard Cohen’s backup singer, along with Erin Dickins, during the 1974 and 1975 Tours) involved a Cohen acrobatic inversion:

There was a very funny day in England when our bus broke down – of course this was way before cell phones or car phones – and Leonard thought we had to get the attention of motorists who were just driving by. So he stood on his head in the middle of the road. It kinda worked.

Emily subsequently searched her own photo stash and was rewarded with the image atop this post.

Originally posted Sep 30, 2013 at 1HeckOfAGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric

Superb Video: Leonard Cohen Performs Hey That’s No Way To Say Goodbye – Rotterdam 2013

Leonard Cohen – Hey That’s No Way To Say Goodbye
Rotterdam: Sept 18, 2013
Video: albertnoonan

Yes, many loved before us, I know that we are not new
In city and in forest they smiled like me and you
But let’s not talk of love or chains and things we can’t untie
Your eyes are soft with sorrow
Hey, that’s no way to say goodbye

Best 2013 Leonard Cohen Videos: The best available video of each of the songs performed during the 2013 Leonard Cohen Old Ideas World Tour can be found at the Best Of 2013 Leonard Cohen Tour Video Setlist

Originally posted Sep 29, 2013 at 1HeckOfAGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric

“I need some chocolate if I’m gonna do this.” Leonard Cohen, Working On Blue Alert With Anjani Thomas

Anjani tells of fueling the Leonard Cohen lyric-writing engine with candy during their work together on the Blue Alert album:

The song was No One After You, and we just needed one line to finish it so I could record it the next day:

I lived in many cities
from Paris to LA
I’ve known rags and riches

It was a bit tense as he paced back and forth. I sat at the piano and didn’t move, didn’t say a word. Then he finally said, “I need some chocolate if I’m gonna do this.”

That would have been milk chocolate, because he doesn’t like dark — and of course I always keep some around — so he ate a bar and about a minute later he came up with the line:

I’m a regular cliche

From personal communication with Anjani Thomas. (Anjani also used this anecdote with some minor differences in an interview with PureMusic.) Photo atop post by Dominique BOILE.

Back On Crescent Street: Montreal Leonard Cohen Mural – Oct 13, 2018

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Information about the pre-mural connections between Leonard Cohen and Crescent Street can be found at

“I was not unaware of the ironic impact of saying, ‘Democracy is coming to the U.S.A.,’ but the song is affirmative. I just can’t keep my tongue in my cheek that long.” Leonard Cohen

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I began to write it when the events in Eastern Europe began to indicate there was a democratic resurrection, and the Berlin Wall came down and people were saying, democracy is coming to the East. I was one of those people who weren’t entirely convinced that this was going to happen, and that it wasn’t going to come about without a tremendous amount of suffering. I was not unaware of the ironic impact of saying, ‘Democracy is coming to the U.S.A.,’ but the song is affirmative. I just can’t keep my tongue in my cheek that long. I’m Canadian, and we watch America very carefully. Everybody in the world watches America. And regardless of the skepticism and irony, [wiseguy] superiority that most intellectual circles have about America, it is acknowledged that this is where the experiment is taking place, where the races are confronting one another, where the rich and poor are confronting one another, where men and women, the classes…this is the great laboratory of democracy.quotedown2

Leonard Cohen

The Loneliness of the Long-Suffering Folkie by Wayne Robins (Newsday: November 22, 1992)

“Everybody makes a continuing negotiation for a changing deal with love, because we need it so much. A deal with our children, mates, lovers, parents.” Leonard Cohen

 

Have women lost the need for love (romantic or otherwise) from men?

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The evidence is that it hasn’t worked out well between men and women, but nobody can penetrate the need. That’s why I write ‘There Ain’t No Cure For Love.’ Nobody can tolerate the ache of separation, nobody can tolerate the vertigo of surrender. But that doesn’t mean we’re going to abandon the whole deal. We’re not going to. Everybody makes a continuing negotiation for a changing deal with love, because we need it so much. A deal with our children, mates, lovers, parents. As men and women.quotedown2

Leonard Cohen

 

From Read Leonard Cohen’s exclusive interview with Hot Press from 1988 by Joe Jackson (Hot Press: 11 Nov 2016)