“The genius of Phil [Spector] is to completely exhaust everyone and call on some special reserve that no one expects to locate and to manifest it.” Leonard Cohen

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The genius of Phil is to completely exhaust everyone and call on some special reserve that no one expects to locate and to manifest it. That is how he get the incredible energy. He frustrates the musicians for hours, refusing to let them play more than one or two bars, and then he lets them play.quotedown2

Leonard Cohen

 

From Leonard Cohen: My album will be classic in 10 years by Mary Campbell. AP: Feb 1978.

“My songs are like documentaries… Some accuse me of being too poetic, but that’s how my imagination works, how I see things. I don’t try to write beautiful phrases.” Leonard Cohen

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My songs are like documentaries or reports. Some accuse me of being too poetic, but that’s how my imagination works, how I see things. I don’t try to write beautiful phrases.quotedown2

Leonard Cohen

 

Leonard Cohen Words And Silences by Constantino Romero (1974). Republished in Rockdelux 356 (December 2016). Via Google Translate. Photo by Pete Purnell

Quality Video: Leonard Cohen Performs Heart With No Companion – Montreal 2012

Leonard Cohen – Heart With No Companion
Montreal: Nov 28, 2012
Video by leonardcohenvideo

This rendition of Heart With No Companion makes me happy. Leonard Cohen singing a song Leonard Cohen wrote, the guys in the band showing off a bit on solos (that’s tour manager Mike Scoble on harmonica), even a little dancing by the ladies – what’s not to like?

Originally posted Nov 30, 2012 at DrHGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric

Video: Eric Burdon Covers Leonard Cohen’s In My Secret Life

Eric Burdon & The Animals perform Leonard Cohen’s “In My Secret Life” in Germany, 2004. The song can be found on My Secret Life (2004), Burdon’s first solo album release with new titles in nearly 16 years.

Originally posted November 14, 2011 at DrHGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric

Leonard Cohen says Suzanne Elrod “outwitted me at every turn”

In 1969, Cohen met 24-year-old Suzanne Elrod, the woman with whom he would share his longest and most tempestuous relationship. (She was not the legendary “Suzanne” of his most famous song, though Cohen admits her name was part of the attraction.) The two formed what Cohen describes as a marriage, though it was never formalized. In the coming years, Cohen’s recordings (including Songs of Love and Hate and Death of a Ladies’ Man) were often-stark portrayals of the struggle for romantic faith amid sexual warfare and of hope in the face of cultural dissolution. Much of the work was about his stormy relationship with Elrod. (She “outwitted me at every turn,” he says.) They had two children together and separated in the mid-’70s.

From Brother of Mercy by Mikal Gilmore, Spin, March 2002