Cars Of Leonard Cohen: Leonard’s Car Talk – Homogenization By Car

Leonard Cohen On Homogenization By Car

Video automatically begins at the pertinent section

Cars Of Leonard Cohen

is a series of posts about actual automobiles owned by or associated with Leonard Cohen, metaphorical cars he employed in his songs, and his thoughts about cars. All posts in this series are collected at as they go online.

“That’s why you pray – because you don’t have a prayer” Listen To CriticsAtLarge Interview with Leonard Cohen (1984)

“[Book Of Mercy] would only be accessible to someone who is in some kind of trouble”

In 1984, Kevin Courrier sat down with poet and singer/songwriter Leonard Cohen to speak about the publication of his latest book of poetry, Book of Mercy. The segment first aired on the radio show, On the Arts, on CJRT-FM in Toronto in 1984. Kevin Courrier writes:

Leonard Cohen and I met once for a conversation in 1984 for “On the Arts” at CJRT-FM after he had come out of a brief retirement from both music and writing. I was aware during our talk that Cohen seemed to be contemplating (and accumulating) more and more unexpressed thoughts as the interview was progressing. So after our chat ended, he asked if he could play me something that he felt might best fully answer some of the questions that the interview kept raising. He was my last guest that morning so all I had was my lunch waiting. Since I had my whole life to eat lunch, but little time to spend with Leonard Cohen, we went into the control room that had just been vacated by my technical producer. He handed me a cassette that was obviously a promo tape with no writing on it and asked me to fast forward it to the concluding song on side two. As I cued the tape titled Various Positions, I brought up the volume on the control board while he lounged back in his chair as I did in mine. As the song began gently, he looked over to me and said, “I think this song best answers your questions during our talk.” What he played was “Hallelujah.” Once it ended, I gave him back the tape, but I forget now what my initial response was. We shook hands and I thanked him for the opportunity to hear this new unreleased song. After escorting him to the door, I went to heat up my lasagna never considering that the song I first heard with Leonard Cohen would turn out one day to be such an enduring one.

Note: If the above embedded player does not function in your browser, listen to the recording at the host site.

Thanks to Gordana Stupar, who alerted me to this recording.

“I always felt I invented Dylan” Hear 1988 Leonard Cohen Ritz Concert + Pete Fornatale Interview

“I’ve studied all the theologies and all the philosophies, but cheerfulness keeps breaking through.”

This recording includes the July 5, 1988 Leonard Cohen concert at the Ritz in New York and, beginning at 1:39:23, an interview by Pete Fornatale broadcast on Mixed Bag on July 31, 1988 (WNEW FM New York).

Mr. Cohen sang songs that ranged across the breadth of his career, from ”Suzanne” to ”Everybody Knows,” to two versions of his recent song, ”First We Take Manhattan,” in which the fashion world and drugs are held up as symbols of the terminal decay of New York. But the turning point of the evening was Mr. Cohen’s spare voice-and-guitar rendition of ”If It Be Your Will,” one of his two or three finest meditations. A prayer for mercy murmured to the void by a world wearing ”rags of light all dressed to kill,” it received a haunting interpretation in Mr. Cohen’s sepulchral bass-baritone growl.1

The interview includes Leonard Cohen discussing the influence of Bob Dylan and the assistance lent by Judy Collins and Jennifer Warnes, his “cheerfulness keeps breaking through” reference (erroneously attributed to Jonson), his multiple revisions that dramatically changed I Can’t Forget, his first public appearance as a singer, his “If I knew where good songs came from, I go there more often” comment, his religious symbolism and the notion of being punished for sin, the difference between a Ladies’ Man and a Romantic, and saying goodbye.

Update: This video has been removed

Continue Reading →

  1. Review/Pop; Leonard Cohen Reflects Darkly On the World by Stephen Holden. New York Times: July 9, 1988 []

Guide To Leonard Cohen Experience: Early Influences, Songwriting, Love, Lifestyle, Zen, Wooing Women With Music, Economics, Songs Vs Poems…

“Leonard Cohen Experience” Videos 1-4: 1988 Interview & Performances

These videos feature segments from an August 1988 Leonard Cohen interview with Mitch Corber, which was to be published in Downtown Magazine (I have been unable to discover if the piece was actually published although the New York Library did purchase the audio tape for their collection), interspersed with songs by Leonard Cohen performed by himself and others. Many of the performances are from the 1988 Austin City Limits show.

Leonard Cohen Experience 1
Interview Content: Comparison of songs and poems; Leonard Cohen’s personal religious perspective; the temptation of lying for love as a theme, King David as a poet and a figure; Buckskin Boys; personal moods; sense of mission; connections between singing and writing careers; style of living; women as companions of the heart.
Songs: Chelsea Hotel #2, Seems So Long Ago Nancy, Lover, Lover, Lover, The Future,  Sisters Of Mercy, others.

Leonard Cohen Experience 2
Continue Reading →

“My poems are always Jewish; they cannot be anything else.” Leonard Cohen Video Interview 1985

From YouTube description [via Google Translate]:

In an interview with Dan Margalit on “New Evening”, Cohen refers to the motives for his work, the way his poems are received by the audience and the media, and also refers to the Jewish point in his writing: “My poems are always ‘Jewish’, they can not To be nothing else. ” At the end of the interview, a section of a clip was broadcast to Cohen’s song Hallelujah. The interview was identified and uploaded to the web as part of the educational archive digitization project. Broadcasted on July 7, 1985