Leonard Cohen Talks About Drugs: “The recreational, the obsessional and the pharmaceutical. I’ve tried them all. I would be enthusiastically promoting any one of them if any one of those worked.”

Interviewer: I asked him… if he’d ever tried psychotherapy…

Leonard Cohen: It was an opinion of mine, based on no research or evidence-well, evidence, yes, because I saw my friends in therapy did not look improved. I preferred to use drugs. I preferred the conventional distractions of wine, women and song. And religion. But it’s all the same.

Interviewer: When you say ‘drugs’ do you mean something like Prozac, or the recreational kind?

Leonard Cohen: Well, the recreational, the obsessional and the pharmaceutical. I’ve tried them all. I would be enthusiastically promoting any one of them if any one of those worked.

From Look Who’s Back at 67: Gentle Leonard Cohen by  Frank DiGiacomo. New York Observer: Oct 15, 2001. Photo by Chris Buck Website Instagram

Look Who Made It Into Sharon Robinson’s On Tour With Leonard Cohen: Mitch, Alex, Roscoe, Hattie, Charley, Neil, Dominique Issermann, Lorca, DrHGuy, Duchess, The Guy Who Carries Leonard Cohen’s Guitar…

I continue to be delighted by the images in Sharon Robinson’s On Tour With Leonard Cohen, which Vogue described as “a book of photographs, 92 percent of which were shot on an iPhone, which gives them a curious sense of intimacy, spontaneity, and complicity, echoing, in a way, the particular closeness of Ms. Robinson and Mr. Cohen’s relationship.”  Now, most folks buy this book because of the photos featuring Leonard Cohen, but there are other treats: many, many shots of other members of the Unified Heart Touring Company (past and present), family, strangers, local scenes, and the occasional hangers-on who show up at soundcheck in Austin.

On Tour with Leonard Cohen By Sharon Robinson (PowerHouse Books: December 9, 2014). Originally posted Dec 11, 2014 at DrHGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric

“Find the positive values between the black and white; non-judgemental values based on real values; a position that acknowledges complexity, yet takes a strong stance.” Leonard Cohen’s Guide To Spirituality

Not least of Roshi’s positive attributes, Leonard stated, was that he “hates religion.” There is, Roshi finds, “something ugly about it. The armor of religion places people in hateful situations.” What is required, Leonard believes, is for people “to find the positive values between the black and white; non-judgemental values based on real values; a position that acknowledges complexity, yet takes a strong stance.”

From Prophet of the Heart by Loranne S. Dorman and Clive L. Rawlins. Omnibus Press: 1990.

Video: Marissa Nadler Covers Leonard Cohen’s Famous Blue Raincoat

Nadler Shrouds Famous Blue Raincoat In Velvet

A video release from Marissa Nadler’s 2007 Songs III: Bird On the Water features her cover of Leonard Cohen’s Famous Blue Raincoat. Her rendition of this classic track from Cohen’s 1971 album, Songs of Love and Hate,1 is …

We interrupt this sentence to bring you the Single-Question, Oversimplified Yet Nonetheless Spot On Marissa Nadler Performance Characterization Quiz:

Question #1. Which single word is most often used to describe a Marissa Nadler performance?

That’s right, Marissa Nadler’s rendition of Famous Blue Raincoat (and almost everything else in her repertoire) is

haunting.2

 

Why Do I Like This Video?

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  1. Judy Collins also included Famous Blue Raincoat on her 1971 album, Living, which was a collection of performances from her 1970 concert tour. []
  2. The judges would also accept wistful, ephemeral, and ethereal, but only because the judges are in a benevolent mood; haunting is clearly the correct and preferred response. []