“You become what you oppose. I never wanted to have children; now I have children. I never wanted to have my own house; now I have my own house. What you do not want, you get … [Pause] Also the things you want, you get.” Leonard Cohen

quoteup2
You become what you oppose. I never wanted to have children; now I have children. I never wanted to have my own house; now I have my own house. What you do not want, you get, if you do not want it strong enough. [Pause] Also the things you want, you get.quotedown2

Leonard Cohen

 

From Leonard Cohen – All culture is nail polish by Bert van de Kamp, OOR magazine No.21, October 23, 1974. [Via Google Translate]. Thanks to Gordana Stupar, who alerted me to this article. Photo property of John Miller.

Q: What is your most treasured material possession? Leonard Cohen: “My body.”

To check out Leonard’s most treasured material possession, see Leonard Cohen Beefcake Video: The Ladies’ Man Keeps His Hat On.

The quotation is from “Q Questionnaire – Leonard Cohen” in Q Magazine, September 1994. Photo by Dominique Issermann.

“You’re never ready for the things that create character.” Leonard Cohen

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You’re never ready for the things that create character. Somehow you have to be tripped in such a way that you’re thrown headlong into the events, and trick yourself by signing up for the tour, or spending the money before you’ve made it, or whatever it is. And then you find that these events create character, these events that you’re never ready for.quotedown2

Leonard Cohen

Leonard Cohen Looks at Himself by Danny Fields. Soho Weekly News, Vol. 1, #9. December 5, 1974.  Photo by Paul-Gerhard Zimmerman.

“A voice is a tool for communication. And as a singer, all you are, really, is a storyteller, and it just so happens that, obviously, with my voice I tell stories a particular way, but if you’re Leonard Cohen, you have a different voice and you still tell great stories.” Iron Maiden’s Bruce Dickinson

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I’m not a great believer that a voice is just about singing. A voice is a tool for communication. And as a singer, all you are, really, is a storyteller, and it just so happens that, obviously, with my voice I tell stories a particular way, but if you’re Leonard Cohen, you have a different voice and you still tell great stories.quotedown2

Bruce Dickinson

 

Sound familiar?  Compare that with “I can hardly carry a tune but I think it’s a true voice in the sense that it’s not a lie. It presents the singer and the story he’s telling.” Leonard Cohen.

From Iron Maiden’s Bruce Dickinson: ‘I’m Not A Great Believer That A Voice Is Just About Singing’ (Blabbermouth: December 11, 2017). Photo by dr_zoidberg

Perla Batalla and Julie Christensen Perform Leonard Cohen’s “Dance Me To The End Of Love”

In Honor Of Leonard Cohen

Perla Batalla and Julie Christensen, who are best known for singing with Leonard Cohen, cover one of his classics, “Dance Me To The End Of Love,” in tribute to him at the Leonard Cohen Event 2004 held at the Knitting Factory, NYC, June 11, 2004.

Perla Batalla and Julie Christensen – Dance Me To The End Of Love
NYC: June 11, 2004.
Video from rlamtk

Originally posted Feb 14, 2011 at 1HeckOfAGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric

“Only the blessing you have given to [words], the way you present them, what they contain, makes them significant.” Leonard Cohen

Does this mean that the words are empty without the emotional content (which you can transmit during the song, but not in the printed poem)?

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Words are important, and they have to be carefully selected if it is your job. You should pay close attention to them, but on the other hand, only the blessing you have given to them, the way you present them, what they contain, makes them significant… It’s like launching a ship. It can just as well be a fishing boat, they do not all have to be ocean vessels. I am thinking about how the village priest blesses the fishermen prior to sailing. I have to have the same respect in my poems. I must plea to some higher power. Everything has to be considered, whether people want to weep or laugh. Whatever you write, you drop into the sea of ​​mankind and it is to be honored with pure respect.quotedown2

Leonard Cohen

 

From ”En tunne vanhenevani lainkaan” – Leonard Cohen Soundissa 1976: The 2016 reprint of a June 1976 Leonard Cohen interview by Dougie Gordon. (Soundi: Nov 11, 2016). Via computer translation. Photo by Martin Colyer.

“If there is really a revolution, it’s against tyranny, and part of tyranny is the notion that there’s one kind of thing for everybody to do.” Leonard Cohen

soho-news

Danny Fields: Oh, Leonard. forgive me, but I have to bring up the revolution. What happened to it?

Leonard Cohen: (laughs) I think everyone perceives that these are times when the work is on the individual for himself, by himself, and the urgency is now for each man to make himself strong. I don’t think anybody is going to put together the whole pattern, or understand all the movements.

Danny Fields: Do you think all hopes for collective strength should be postponed?

Leonard Cohen: I think that people should clearly perceive what kind of activity strengthens them, and what kind of activity disintegrates them. I think those who have a talent or a gift for—or are nourished by—collective enterprise should throw themselves in with it, and those who are nourished by another kind of activity should embrace that. I think if there is really a revolution, it’s against tyranny, and part of tyranny is the notion that there’s one kind of thing for everybody to do.

Leonard Cohen Looks at Himself by Danny Fields. Soho Weekly News, Vol. 1, #9. December 5, 1974.