“And even today / I stop every scottie / to claim you back” Final Lines of To Tinkie from The Flame by Leonard Cohen

To Tinkie is a passage from The Notebooks section of The Flame by Leonard Cohen (background information at The Flame – Leonard Cohen’s Final Book). Tinkie was the Scottish Terrier Leonard called “the closest being to me during my childhood.”

The following excerpt is from Leonard Cohen’s 2001 interview with Stina Lundberg, The above photo of Tinkie, Esther Cohen (Leonard’s sister), & Leonard Cohen was contributed by Maarten Massa.

SL: Did you have a dog when you were little?

LC: Yes, I had a Scottie, Scottish terrier. His name was, my mother named him, Tovarich, “comrad”. We called him Tinkie.  And yes, a very – I guess the closest being to me during my childhood. The dog would sleep under my bed and follow me to school, and wait for me. So that was a great sense of companionship.

SL: Because you sometimes write about the dog.

LC: Well I have his picture on my dresser in Los Angeles. We loved that dog. My sister gave me his picture framed as a present.

SL: And what happened when he died?

LC: He died when he was about 13 years old, which is quite old for a dog. And he just asked to go out one night – you know how a dog will just go and stand beside the door? – so we opened the door, it was a winter night, and he walked out, and we never saw him again. And it was very distressing. I put ads in the newspaper, and people would say, “Yes, we have found a Scottie,” and you’d drive 50 miles and it wouldn’t be your Scottie. And we only found him in the springtime when the snow melted, and the smell came from under the neighbour’s porch. He’d just gone outside, and gone under the neighbour’s porch to die. It was some kind of charity to his owners.

Forget Your Perfect Offering: Kristen Wiig & James Corden Perform Hallelujah/Holly How Ya/Hello Julia – The Late Late Show 2017

On Dec. 6, 2017, Kristen Wiig joined James Corden to perform a malaprop-laden version of “Hallelujah” on The Late Late Show with James Corden.

Thanks to Duke of Derm, aka Russ Hall, who alerted me to this video.

“I’ve had people tell me that my records have made their lives not worth living.” Leonard Cohen

“We knew you could do it, Lenny”

A few weeks ago Cohen received in the mail a newspaper clipping from a South African newspaper, a story about a surgeon named Leonard Cohen who specializes in restoring severed limbs. Scrawled across the sheet was an inscription: “We knew you could do it, Lenny.”

Cohen told me about it in a bar several nights before, and we are laughing about it again. “You know,” I say, “you bring it on yourself, Leonard.”

“Yeah,” he says with a smile. “Yeah, I guess I do.”

Cohen relishes and takes with good humour the bleak proportions of his artistic persona – “I’ve had people tell me that my records have made their lives not worth living.”

From Conversations from a Room by Tom Chaffin. Canadian Forum: August/September 1983. Photo by Armando Fusco. Originally posted June 11, 2013 at DrHGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric

Photos & Autograph Of Sharon Robinson – 2012 Ghent Leonard Cohen-Fest

It turns out that Dominique BOILE not only met and photographed the Webb Sisters during his time in Ghent but also ran into Sharon Robinson, thus hitting the trifecta of Leonard Cohen backup singers.

Dominique captured Sharon’s autograph on her Everybody Knows album and these nifty photos of the woman Leonard Cohen introduces as “The Incomparable Sharon Robinson” and Dominique calls “The Beautiful Sharon.”

As a bonus, the final image in the series displays the interesting design of the All Access pass Sharon is wearing.

Originally posted August 17, 2012 at DrHGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric

Leonard Cohen Evoked In Children’s Book: How To Be A Lion By Ed Vere

Ed Vere, an award winning and New York Times bestselling writer & illustrator of picture books, has authored a children’s book called How To Be a Lion. So, what does that have to do with Leonard Cohen? Well, the plot features a lion named Leonard, who writes poems and whose best friend is a duck named Marianne. This brings Leonard in for some criticism from other lions:

We heard you’re gentle. We heard you make up poems. But not chomping a duck? You’ve gone too far!

The story about the importance of being true to yourself, mindfulness, and standing by your friends and the charming illustrations have garnered a batch of laudatory reviews for the book.

How to be a Lion by Ed Vere is published by Puffin. Suggested age range: 3-5.

“The genius of Phil [Spector] is to completely exhaust everyone and call on some special reserve that no one expects to locate and to manifest it.” Leonard Cohen

Embed from Getty Images

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The genius of Phil is to completely exhaust everyone and call on some special reserve that no one expects to locate and to manifest it. That is how he get the incredible energy. He frustrates the musicians for hours, refusing to let them play more than one or two bars, and then he lets them play.quotedown2

Leonard Cohen

 

From Leonard Cohen: My album will be classic in 10 years by Mary Campbell. AP: Feb 1978.

“My songs are like documentaries… Some accuse me of being too poetic, but that’s how my imagination works, how I see things. I don’t try to write beautiful phrases.” Leonard Cohen

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My songs are like documentaries or reports. Some accuse me of being too poetic, but that’s how my imagination works, how I see things. I don’t try to write beautiful phrases.quotedown2

Leonard Cohen

 

Leonard Cohen Words And Silences by Constantino Romero (1974). Republished in Rockdelux 356 (December 2016). Via Google Translate. Photo by Pete Purnell