Leonard Cohen On Bob Dylan And Bob Dylan On Leonard Cohen

Leonard Cohen’s comment about Bob Dylan being awarded the Nobel Prize, “It’s like pinning a medal on Mount Everest for being the highest mountain,” is a notable but hardly exclusive manifestation of the interface between the preeminent bards of contemporary music. Since the 1960s, Leonard Cohen and Bob Dylan shared what Larry “Ratso” Sloman has called “a relationship of tremendous mutual respect.”

A collection of posts about the interface between Leonard Cohen & Bob Dylan, including their opinions of each other, their interactions, and their occasional differences can be found at ce

Credits: Leonard’s evaluation of Bob Dylan is from a 1994 Q Magazine interview (photo courtesy of Leonard Cohen); Bob Dylan’s assessment of Leonard is from the 2016 New Yorker Leonard Cohen profile by David Remnick (photo by Alberto Cabello via Wikipedia Commons).

Leonard Cohen Talks About How Bob Dylan Did And Did Not Impact His Musical Career

cdi

 

From Lenny Plays It Cool by Bud Scoppa (Music Connection, April 6-19, 1987)

The Cohen-Dylan Interface

Posts about Leonard Cohen’s & Bob Dylan’s opinions of each other, their meetings, and comparisons by others can be found at

“Isn’t that wonderful when all the pieces fit?” Leonard Cohen Talks About The Impact Of Songs That Resonate

quoteup2
It’s just how they [songs] resonate. You know they resonate with a truth that is hard to locate but which is operating with some force in your life. I often feel that about a Dylan song or a song even with Edith Piaf…the words are going too fast for me to really understand them in French but you feel that they are talking about something that is true, that you can’t locate by yourself and someone has located it for you and you just feel like you’ve put in the last piece in the jigsaw puzzle for that moment. That a moment has been clarified. The moment that you’re in at the moment that you’re listening to it. Yeah, the pieces fit…Isn’t that wonderful when all the pieces fit?quotedown2

Leonard Cohen

 

Leonard Cohen’s response to the comment by Lian Lunson, director of the I’m Your Man documentary (2005), that The Traitor was one of her favorite songs but “I can’t get my hands around what it’s about.” From Leonard Cohen on Leonard Cohen: Interviews and Encounters by Jeff Burger, (Chicago Review Press, Apr 1, 2014). Photo by Dominique BOILE.

Cambridge University To Offer Bob Dylan & Leonard Cohen Course

Excerpt from Bob Dylan and Leonard Cohen course being run at Cambridge University by Ciaran Gold (Cambridge News: Aug 25, 2017):

The Institute of Continuing Education is running a two-day course called Changing Times, which is focusing on the work of Dylan and Cohen in the 1960s. A spokeswoman said writer Jem Poster and musicologist Stephen Ferron would examine “lyrics and music” during the course, being held on Saturday September 2 and Sunday September 3. She added students would study Dylan at sessions called Folk And Protest, Bringing It All Back Home, Highway 61 Revisited and Blonde On Blonde and Cohen at sessions called Poet And Singer, Songs Of Leonard Cohen, Songs From A Room and Songs Of Love And Hate.

Leonard Cohen Quotes Dylan: “As Dylan says in one of his songs, ‘I know my song well before I start singing’ That’s usually the case because it takes so long to really know it.”

From Lenny Plays It Cool by Bud Scoppa (Music Connection, April 6-19, 1987)

Note: The Dylan song from which Mr Cohen quotes is, of course, “A Hard Rain’s A-Gonna Fall”

Leonard Cohen-Bob Dylan Interface

All posts about Leonard Cohen’s & Bob Dylan’s opinions of each other, their meetings, and comparisons by others can be found at

Note: Originally posted at DrHGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric

University of Cape Town Professor Lesley Marx To Lecture On Music Of Leonard Cohen and Bob Dylan

Prof Marx will host two lectures on Cohen and Dylan, as a part of UCT’s Winter School programme, on 5 and 12 August. She says her lectures aim to link their work without making any insidious comparisons.

More information at Professor explores meaning behind music of Leonard Cohen and Bob Dylan (Cape Talk: 4 August 2017)

Credit Due Department: UCT photo by Adrian Frith – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikipedia Commons