Photo: Leonard Cohen In Cool Young Troubadour Mode c. 1972

Embed from Getty Images

The Getty archive doesn’t offer this photo’s date, location, or photographer. Comparing this to other, dated photos, my best guess is that this shot was taken during the 1972 tour.

Les Ballets Jazz de Montréal To Perform Leonard Cohen’s Dance Me – Vancouver Nov 22, 2018

 

Montreal’s BJM has announced it will bring the new Leonard Cohen’s Dance Me to Vancouver’s Queen Elizabeth Theatre on November 22. Approved by Leonard Cohen during his lifetime, with artistic direction by Robitaille and the dramaturgy of Eric Jean, the 14-dancer ode to the late poet-singer-songwriter plays on “the cycles of existence in five seasons, as described in Cohen’s deeply reflective music and poems”, according to today’s announcement

From BJM to bring contemporary-dance ode to Leonard Cohen here on November 22 by Janet Smith (Straight: June 18, 2018)

“I am aware my passionate love affair with Leonard Cohen in my Paris days is at least partly responsible for the dissolution of my then relationship. But I don’t hold it against you, Leonard.”

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Leonard is, no doubt, relieved to be forgiven. A nice piece about the relationship between Leonard Cohen and his fans, many of whom are sacrificing their budgets, risking their jobs, and straining their relationships to attend the 2008 Tour concerts. “He’s my man” by Julian Tompkin (The Australian: June 7, 2008). Photo by Michael Bromfield.

Originally posted June 8, 2008 at DrHGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric

“The routine softens you, you stop thinking about yourself, your plans and you’re too tired to accuse yourself of many things and you’re not bright enough to think about the things around – you kind of smooth out.” Leonard Cohen On Life At Mt Baldy Zen Center

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I really like that life, it’s very regulated and it has some kind of a military crispness to it. And then, you’ re doing it for a reason. It’s not to build up your muscles, it’s not just a macho exercise, it’s to kind of cook your mind so that you can hear what you’re saying, because you can’t hear what you’re saying if you’re full of yourself. If the daily life hasn’t emptied you out a bit through fatigue or eh… just what would I say, the routine, the routine softens you, you stop thinking about yourself, your plans and you’re too tired to accuse yourself of many things and you’re not bright enough to think about the things around – you kind of smooth out. That’s what the daily life does to you. So that you’re open to hear something, you know most of us are not open most of the time, we pretend that we are open, but mostly you’re running your own dramatic event of which you are the hero or the heroine. Usually that’s what we are doing most of the time. So there you get so tired that you can’t pretend, and that’s all that a monastery is. They make you so tired that you give up pretending.quotedown2

Leonard Cohen

 

Leonard Looks Back On The Past: Interview With Leonard Cohen by Kari Hesthamar.  Los Angeles, 2005 (Unedited  interview for Norwegian Radio). Found at LeonardCohenFiles

Note: Originally posted June 30, 2013 at DrHGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric

“With Hydra, it was love at first sight. The people, the architecture,the sky, the mules, the smell, the life. Everything you looked at was beautiful.” Leonard Cohen

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What made you stay there [on Hydra]?

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For one thing, economic reasons: I had little money. Renting the house cost me $14 a month. As for the climate, I had never been in a warm place, I did not know what the Mediterranean climate looked like, it was a delightful surprise. In England, everything is very humid, the beds are wet at night, that’s why women are so strong! (Laughs). The first night Mrs. Pullman gave me a kettle. Why? Undo your bed and you’ll know why (laughs)? With Hydra, it was love at first sight. The people, the architecture,the sky, the mules, the smell, the life. Everything you looked at was beautiful, every corner, every lamp, everything you touched, everything you used was in its proper place. The relationship with the water: there was no running water, you had to catch the water drop by drop, so you knew every drop. You knew everything you used, every time you lit the lamp, you knew that you would have to fill it and clean it the next day. The things you used were rich. It was a very nice feeling. It was more animated than any city, much more cosmopolitan. There were Germans, Scandinavians, Australians, Americans, Dutch who you would run into in very intimate settings like the back of grocery stores.quotedown2

Leonard Cohen

 

From Comme Un Guerrier by Christian Fevret (Les Inrocks: Aug 21, 1991). Via Google Translate.