“You sense the destruction of your body & your mind, and you feel here is…the last boxing ring, or the last Ouija board, where you can examine some of the ideas that have intrigued you. That have seized you, really.” Leonard Cohen


quoteup2
The clear sense that you know you’re in the homeward stretch is a very compelling component in writing. A lot of other things fall away that you hope would satisfy you like human life, and your work becomes a kind of haven, and you want to go there, and you’re grateful when the time opens in such a way that you can actually sit down and work at your own work, because everything else somehow has failed. I’m speaking not just for myself. Somehow, just in the nature of things, you know, the disappointments accumulate, and the obstacles multiply and you sense the destruction of your body, and your mind, and you feel here is the last arena, ‘arena’ is too big, the last boxing ring, or the last Ouija board, where you can examine some of the ideas that have intrigued you. That have seized you, really.quotedown2

Leonard Cohen

Coffee and candour with Cohen by Simon Houpt (Globe & Mail: Feb. 27, 2009). Originally posted July 25, 2010 at DrHGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric

Leonard Cohen On Growing Old “It’s one of the most compassionate ways of saying goodbye that the cosmos could devise …”


quoteup2
It’s one of the most compassionate ways of saying goodbye that the cosmos could devise. I think it’s perfect. It’s an impeccable way to get off centre stage, and everything that happens to you seems so appropriate.quotedown2

Leonard Cohen

 

From Life Of A Lady’s Man by Brian D. Johnson. Maclean’s: Dec 7, 1992. Originally posted Jul 10, 2014 at DrHGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric

Leonard Cohen On Aging: “A Very Interesting Process”

leonardcohen120912w-lorca-cohen
quoteup2
Getting older, of course, is the only game in town. It is really a very interesting process. My friend [Irving] Layton called it ‘the inescapable lousiness of growing old,’ but I don’t know if I subscribe to this. I think it takes about 65 years to find your way around the block. quotedown2

Leonard Cohen

 

From Leonard Cohen on The Book Of Longing – May 2006 CBC Interview with Shelagh Rogers

Leonard Cohen: “One of the things about getting older is that you stop whining …”

lchead
quoteup2
One of the things about getting older is that you stop whining. One of the reasons you stop whining is because your experience conveys to you that your trouble is tiny compared to lots of trouble around. Once you feel that clearly, that your trouble is tiny and that there are people at this moment really being tortured, really being strapped to chairs, really having electrodes pasted on their bodies, that there are situations which are truly hellish that thousands, maybe millions of people are in at this moment, then even though you do not wish to deny the truth of your own feelings, once you put your own feelings in perspective, then there is an invitation never again to whine about your own situation.quotedown2

Leonard Cohen

 

From Leonard Cohen: A Portrait in First Person. Interviewer: Moses Znaimer. CBC, 1988. Originally posted June 26, 2011 at DrHGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric

“As you grow older, you forgive your rivals, your children and everyone else. The closer you get to the end of the race, the more generous you are with the other runners.” Leonard Cohen

leonard-cohen3-courtesy-of-leonard-cohen

quoteup2
When men are young, they don’t forgive. The world is very competitive. As you grow older, you forgive your rivals, your children and everyone else. The closer you get to the end of the race, the more generous you are with the other runners.quotedown2

Leonard Cohen

 

Leonard Cohen, quoted in Comme Un Guerrier by Christian Fevret (Throat Culture magazine, 1992). Credit Due Department: Photo by Anjani Thomas. Originally posted January 1, 2013 at DrHGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric

Hear Leonard Cohen Recite 6 Poems & Talk About The Book of Longing, Roshi, Irving Layton, Aging ….

booklonginxgIn May 2006, Shelagh Rogers interviewed Leonard Cohen about his just published collection of poetry, Book Of Longing. In addition to touching on a number of topics, including his stay at the Mt Baldy Zen monastery, Leonard reads the following poems:

  • Layton’s Question
  • Fun
  • Only One Thing Made Him Happy
  • Disturbed This Morning
  • Fun
  • Titles

Leonard Cohen on The Book Of Longing
CBC Interview with Shelagh Rogers: May 2006

Note: Some browsers will not display content from non-https sites. In such cases, listen to the audio at the host site.