“I listen to radio a good deal. I have my views as to whether the music is good and is speaking to me, but I certainly recognize that I’m part of it.” Leonard Cohen On Pop Culture

Do you like pop culture?

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Sure. When it’s good. I don’t feel separated from it. I listen to radio a good deal. I have my views as to whether the music is good and is speaking to me, but I certainly recognize that I’m part of it. I never felt ‘that’s going on and I’m not with it.’ I always felt it was mine and I always felt it was good and there’s always something good happening in that realm at all times. quotedown2

Leonard Cohen

 

Also see Leonard Cohen’s Formula For Choosing Car Radio Stations

From Leonard Cohen: Working for the World to Come. The interview (probably from 1982) was published in the book In Their Own Words: Interviews with fourteen Canadian writers, by Bruce Mayer and Brian O’Riordan, 1984. Found at LeonardCohenfiles. The image of Leonard Cohen in the bath with amcopy of Esquire at the ready and the transistor radio on the soap tray is a screen capture from 1965 documentary, “Ladies and Gentlemen… Mr. Leonard Cohen.” Originally posted Sep 20, 2011 at DrHGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric

Leonard Cohen On Bob Dylan: “He’s probably the most sophisticated singer we’ve had in a generation”

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Most music criticism is in the nineteenth century. It’s so far behind, say, the criticism of painting. It’s still based on nineteenth-century art – cows beside a stream and trees and ‘I know what I like.’ There’s no concession to the fact that Dylan might be a more sophisticated singer than Whitney Houston, that he’s probably the most sophisticated singer we’ve had in a generation.quotedown2

Leonard Cohen

 

Leonard Cohen’s Nervous Breakthrough by Mark Rowland, Musician, July 1988

Leonard Cohen-Bob Dylan Interface

A collection of posts about the interface between Leonard Cohen & Bob Dylan, including their opinions of each other, their interactions, and their occasional differences can be found at

Leonard Cohen Responds To “Why I Write the Same Old Song”

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I think any artist — writer, singer, or painter — has only one or two paintings that he does over and over. quotedown2

Leonard Cohen

 

From “Yakety Yak” by Scott Cohen (1994). Ad image atop this post contributed by Dominique BOILE. Originally posted May 21, 2010 at DrHGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric

Leonard Cohen On His Inspiration For The Original “Band Aid” Opening Lines Of Ain’t No Cure For Love

[Did Ain’t No Cure For Love start out] about the SALT Treaty?

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Actually, one of the things on my mind was that I was very pissed off at Band Aid, this moment in musical history where everyone took care of ‘we gave at the office.’ It was very nice, but first of all, I hadn’t been asked by anybody to sing. [smiles] So the song started off ‘From the heart of man to the heart of God the ladder’s been removed / And there ain’t no band-aid big enough to cover up this wound.’ That idea.quotedown2

Leonard Cohen

“From the heart of man to the heart of God the ladder’s been removed / And there ain’t no band-aid big enough to cover up this wound” is an early version of the opening lines of Ain’t No Cure For Love. The excerpt if from Leonard Cohen’s Nervous Breakthrough by Mark Rowland. Musician: July 1988.

“Some moments in The Hand That Rocks the Cradle were as fine as anything I’ve seen by you [Rebecca De Mornay] or anyone else” Leonard Cohen

In 1993, Leonard Cohen, the singer-songwriter and poet who was perhaps the world’s greatest interviewee, switched roles to interview Rebecca De Mornay, the gorgeous movie actress who was, for a time, Mr. Cohen’s fiancée. The following excerpt is from From Knowing Rebecca de Mornay Like Only Leonard Cohen Can by Leonard Cohen with William Claxton. Interview magazine. June 1, 1993:

Leonard Cohen: What would you say was your finest moment on the screen?

Rebecca De Mornay: What would you say?

Leonard Cohen: I thought some moments in The Hand That Rocks the Cradle were as fine as anything I’ve seen by you or anyone else, such as the moment where you beat up the bathroom with a shovel. Or was it a plunger?

Rebecca De Mornay: It was a plunger.

Leonard Cohen: I thought that was a rare moment of a woman’s anger onscreen.

Rebecca De Mornay: It’s a very difficult thing for people to accept, seeing women act out anger on the screen. We’re more accustomed to seeing men expressing rage and women crying.

Leonard Cohen’s tentative definition of Black Romantic: “A romantic who can tell a joke about it”


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I’ve never known precisely what a Romantic was…I’ve been described as a Black Romantic – I don’t really know what that is either. That’s what – a romantic who can tell a joke about it.quotedown2

Leonard Cohen

 

From an August 1988 interview with Mitch Corber. Originally posted April 2, 2014 at DrHGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric

“I never try to baffle or mystify [with my songs] although I can understand that with the habit of literal reading that is taught in schools it is sometimes difficult to enjoy the work.” Leonard Cohen

From Have You Heard The One About Lenny In The Sandwich Bar? by Andrew Tyler. Disc: September 2, 1972. Originally posted October 14, 2013 at DrHGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric

“I understand what the blues is now… It’s just talking to your baby.” Leonard Cohen After Stevie Ray Vaughan Performance

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Roscoe [Beck] and I took Leonard to hear Stevie [Ray Vaughan] one night at the Hollywood Bowl, and Leonard was silent for a good half-hour after the show. We were walking in silence to the car. And finally Leonard said: ‘I understand what the blues is now.’ I said, ‘What is it you understand?’ And he said: ‘It’s just talking to your baby.’ In other words: It’s intimate. It’s as close to the truth as possible.quotedown2

Jennifer Warnes

 

Let’s Go To The Well by Brad Buchholz (Austin American-Statesman: 2002). Accessed at Jennifer Warnes website. Photo by Paul Lannuier. Originally posted July 18, 2010 at DrHGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric