“The genius of Phil [Spector] is to completely exhaust everyone and call on some special reserve that no one expects to locate and to manifest it.” Leonard Cohen

Embed from Getty Images

quoteup2
The genius of Phil is to completely exhaust everyone and call on some special reserve that no one expects to locate and to manifest it. That is how he get the incredible energy. He frustrates the musicians for hours, refusing to let them play more than one or two bars, and then he lets them play.quotedown2

Leonard Cohen

 

From Leonard Cohen: My album will be classic in 10 years by Mary Campbell. AP: Feb 1978.

Leonard Cohen Collaborates With Phil Spector & Taunts Phil’s Bodyguard, “You’re a motherfucking pussycat. You don’t even know how to use that [gun]”

Embed from Getty Images

From Leonard Cohen by John Walsh (MOJO: Sept 1994). Originally posted at DrHGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric

“[Phil Spector] is very nice but he pretends to be violent. He kept a lot of guns around and armed bodyguards; bullets and wine bottles littered the floor…A pretty dangerous situation.” Leonard Cohen

Embed from Getty Images

quoteup2
I knew his [Spector’s] songs, I liked his work a lot. But I didn’t know what it was to work with him in the studio! He had come to one of my concerts here in Los Angeles at the Troubadour. After the concert, Phil invited us to his house. The house was freezing because of the air conditioning; it was four degrees. He locked the door so we couldn’t leave. I said ‘Listen Phil, if you lock us in here, we are going to get bored… So as long as we are locked up we might as well write some songs together.’ So we started that very night. We wrote songs together for about a month, it was fun. Phil is really a charming guy when you are with him alone. I would write the words, then he would work on the melody, then I would revise the words to better fit the melody. We would exchange ideas. But in the studio when other people were around he was a totally different man. He is very nice but he pretends to be violent. He kept a lot of guns around and armed bodyguards; bullets and wine bottles littered the floor…A pretty dangerous situation. I wouldn’t say Phil is someone lovable, but he wasn’t mean – except once when he pointed a gun to my throat and then cocked it. He said ‘I love you Leonard.’ I responded ‘I hope you love me Phil.’ (laughs)… Once in the studio he pointed a revolver at the violinist who then packed up his violin and ran out (laughs)… But it was a bad time for Phil too. My mother was dying of leukemia, I was constantly going between Montreal and Los Angeles…quotedown2

Leonard Cohen

From Comme Un Guerrier by Christian Fevret (Les Inrocks: Aug 21, 1991). Via Google Translate. Originally posted Feb 22, 2013 at DrHGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric

More Posts About the Leonard Cohen Phil Spector Collaboration

Leonard Cohen Explains Why Phil Spector’s Death Of A Ladies’ Man Recording Sessions Lasted Until Early Morning Hours

Embed from Getty Images

quoteup2
Phil [Spector] would make his opinions on LA football teams clear to everyone, taking a couple of hours. His analysis of the basketball situation in North America took hours every night and he talked about his devotion to laws that let us carry firearms.quotedown2

Leonard Cohen

 

From Leonard Cohen: My album will be classic in 10 years By Mary Campbell. AP: Feb 1978. Originally posted August 3, 2016 at DrHGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric

“Women are the content of men, men are the content of women, so everybody’s involved in this enterprise with everything they’ve got, and most hanging on by the skin of their teeth… nobody masters the situation.” Leonard Cohen

Stina Lundberg: But you tried to kill the ladies’ man in the ’70s already. “Death of a Ladies’ Man.”

Leonard Cohen: Well, women took care of that.

Stina Lundberg: How do you mean?

Leonard Cohen (chuckles) I didn’t try to kill anyone. I felt I got creamed, in a certain way. But everybody has that feeling of the disaster of the heart, because nobody masters the heart, nobody’s a real ladies’ man, or a love gangster, nobody really gets a handle on that, your heart just cooks like shish kebab in your breast, sizzling and crackling, and too hot for the body… so those descriptions of course are easy and a kind of joke, a kind of simple description, but I haven’t really met… I’ve known some men who have real reputations as ladies’ men and who are real ladykillers, and they don’t have a handle on it either. I don’t think anybody feels very confident in that realm, whatever level you’re operating.

Stina Lundberg: So how did you feel?

LC: Well the reputation was completely undeserved, for one thing. I don’t think my concerns about women and about sex were any deeper or more elaborate than any other guy that I met. That seemed to be the content of most people’s – you know, women are the content of men, men are the content of women, so everybody’s involved in this enterprise with everything they’ve got, and most hanging on by the skin of their teeth…as I say, nobody masters the situation, especially if it really touches the heart, then one is in a condition of anxiety most of the time. And even the great ladies’ men, and I’ve met some real ones – I’m not in their league. The sense of anxiety about the conquest is still very much there. Because in any case, the woman chooses.

Stina Lundberg: How?

Leonard Cohen: I think the woman – the woman chooses. It’s been told to me that the woman chooses, and she decides within seconds of meeting the man whether or not she’s going to – give herself to him. In any case I think – in most cases the woman is running the show in these matters, and I’m happy to let them have it.

From Stina Lundberg’s Interview with Leonard Cohen in Paris, 2001

Note: Originally posted Mar 25, 2011 at DrHGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric

Looking For The Best Song Referencing Leonard Cohen: Amanda Shires Sings “A Song for Leonard Cohen”

amanda_shires_01

A Song for Leonard Cohen is a sly, flirtatious, clever homage to the Canadian singer-songwriter Amanda Shires released on her Down Fell the Doves album.

In Amanda Shires at Music City Roots she explains,

“I wrote it as an exercise on his birthday,” says Shires, who has a verse from Cohen’s “Hallelujah” tattooed on her forearm. “But I did not write it in hopes that he would hear it, In fact, if I had thought there’d ever be a chance in hell of him actually hearing it, I never would have written it, because that would be mortifying. But I admire and respect him so much, and that would be my dream encounter with him. Dreaming is a safe way to have fun.”

Ongoing readers may recall Amanda Shires from her previous appearances on DrHGuy.com, a predecessor this site, as the host of tattoos inspired by Leonard Cohen, such as the lines from Leonard Cohen’s Take This Waltz that arch across her back.

The photo below displays Leonard Cohen lyrics inked her arms and Bob Dylan lyrics etched on the arm of Jason Isbell, her husband.

Photo atop this post by Erica Shires – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0,via Wikipedia. Second photo taken by and used with permission of Kirk Stauffer Photography. The photo of the tattooed arms was posted by Melissa Block via Twitter

Originally posted August 5, 2013 at DrHGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric

“I’m very fond of Phil Spector…he’s one of the great, magnificent figures…It’s just that I don’t have much of an appetite for magnificence” Leonard Cohen

quoteup2
I’m very fond of Phil Spector. I think he’s one of the great, magnificent figures on the landscape. It’s just that I don’t have much of an appetite for magnificencequotedown2

Leonard Cohen

From Love Me, Love My Gun Barrel by Graham Lock. New Musical Express: February 23, 1980. Originally June 21, 2013 posted at DrHGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric