Leonard Cohen Photos Used On First Editions Of Energy Of Slaves

Dominique BOILE offers these portraits of Leonard Cohen used as cover art for The Energy Of Slaves. The photo atop this post is the back cover of the English paperback edition (Jonathan Cape 1972).

The image immediately below is found on the back cover of the first UK edition of Energy Of Slaves by Leonard Cohen (1972 – Jonathan Cape Ltd, London).

Below is the cover from he first Canadian edition of Energy Of Slaves by Leonard Cohen (1972 – McClelland And Stewart Ltd., Toronto). This photo, taken by Suzanne Elrod in Mexico in 1972 was also used for the cover of the Leonard Cohen: Live Songs album.

Originally posted June 13, 2014 at DrHGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric

“It was only when you walked away I saw you had the perfect ass… ” Leonard Cohen

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It was only when you walked away I saw you had the perfect ass. Forgive me for not falling in love with your face or your conversation.quotedown2

Leonard Cohen
The Energy Of Slaves

Leonard Cohen On Sighting The Perfect Ass & Other Poems1
The Apollo in Glasgow: May 15, 1976
Video by Allan Showalter

The image atop this post is the back cover of The Energy Of Slaves (1972). Contributed by Dominique BOILE. Originally posted February 5, 2009 at DrHGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric

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  1. These poems are in the concert setlist:
    11. I did not know until you walked away…
    12. Come down to my room…
    13. A person who eats meat
    14. Valentina gave me four months…
    15. I know there is no such thing as hell or heaven…
    16. the 15-year old girls…
    17. The Music Crept by Us
    18. It’s Good to Sit with People… []

“In [The Energy Of Slaves] I say that I’m in pain. I don’t say it in those words because I don’t like those words. They don’t represent the real situation.” Leonard Cohen


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I’ve just written a book called The Energy Of Slaves, and in there I say that I’m in pain. I don’t say it in those words because I don’t like those words. They don’t represent the real situation. It took 80 poems to represent the situation of where I am right now. That to me totally acquits me of any responsibility I have of keeping a record public. I put it in the book. It’s carefully worked on, you know. It’s taken many years to write and it’s there. It’ll be between hard covers and it’ll be there for as long as people want to keep it in circulation. It’s careful and controlled and it’s what we call art… It’s my work, that’s all. And part of the nature of my work is to reach people. I mean I’m not very interested in playing to empty halls. My work is to make songs and poems and I use whatever material I have at hand. I don’t have the luxury of a vast range of material. I’m not entirely happy with the subject matter. I’d like to broaden my subject matter but as it is right now I only work with what is given. I am interested in this book’s reception. I’m interested in how it will be received almost more than any other book, because I have the feeling that by making it public I may be making a mistake. I hope that I will find that this gnawing feeling is wrong or that I have misread it.quotedown2

Leonard Cohen

 

From Famous last words from Leonard Cohen by Paul Saltzman (Macleans: June 10, 1972)

Note: Compare with Leonard Cohen On The “Difference Between Life And Art”

Leonard Cohen’s Energy Of Slaves Signed By Author, Lou Reed, & Bono

Mandy MacLeod spotted this 1975 German edition of Leonard Cohen’s Energy Of Slaves (Die Energie von Sklaven: Zweitausendeins, Germany 1975) rendered unique by the fact it was given by Lou Reed to Jeremy Reed in June 1987 and is inscribed,

To Jeremy
Best wishes
Lou Reed

It is also signed by Bono with the inscription,

It’ll give you hope
Bono

And, it is signed by the author, Leonard Cohen

Credit Due Department: Cover image contributed by Dominique BOILE .

Note: Originally posted April 19, 2014 at DrHGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric

“[Leonard Cohen’s The Energy of Slaves & Death of a Lady’s Man] remain secret books; deeply personal … unlike almost anything else in our literature from the period.”

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Both The Energy of Slaves and Death of a Lady’s Man are almost wholly bare of Jewish reference. We are nowhere near the lush and loveable biblical imagery of Cohen’s best known song, Hallelujah. In a few poems in Death of a Lady’s Man one gets the impression that Cohen has been reading his Bible. In one he suggests that the patriarch’s prescription for building an altar there is useful material for him as he thinks of building a book of poems. Jewishness, when it enters the poems, is a kind of occult code, as mysterious as the 16th century image on the book’s dust cover. Cohen’s poetry volumes for the ’70s remain secret books; deeply personal, cruel in their emotional landscape; unlike almost anything else in our literature from the period. They’re not an easy read. But they are fine to hold in your hand, like an old dinged-up but eminently playable guitar.quotedown2

 

From The books that got away: Leonard Cohen in the ’70s by Norman Ravvin (Canadian Jewish News: January 20, 2017). The complete article is available at the link.

Best Halloween Pick Up Line From A Leonard Cohen Poem: “I perceived the outline of your breasts through your Hallowe’en costume”

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The Energy Of Slaves (back cover) by Leonard Cohen – Canada: 1974

I perceived the outline of your breasts
through your Hallowe’en costume
I knew you were falling in love with me
because no other man could perceive
the advance of your bosom into his imagination
It was a rupture of your unusual modesty
for me and me alone
through which you impressed upon my shapeless hunger
the incomparable and final outline of your breasts
like two deep fossil shells
which remained all night long and probably forever

Poem 17 from The Energy of Slaves by Leonard Cohen. Scan atop this post contributed by Dominique BOILE. View other Leonard Cohen photos used as back cover art at Leonard Cohen On The Back Cover

Originally posted Oct 17, 2013 at DrHGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric