Suzanne Vega’s “If You Were (In My Movie)” Is On Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox

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Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox

Biggest Influence on My Music – The jukebox. I lived beside jukeboxes all through the fifties. … I never knew who was singing. I never followed things that way. I still don’t. I wasn’t a student of music; I was a student of the restaurant I was in — and the waitresses. The music was a part of it. I knew what number the song was.

– Leonard Cohen (Yakety Yak by Scott Cohen, 1994)

Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox: Over the years, Leonard Cohen has mentioned a number of specific songs he favors. Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox is a Cohencentric feature that began collecting these tunes for the edification and entertainment of viewers on April 4, 2009. All posts in the Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox series can be found at The Original Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox Page.

Suzanne Vega “make[s] austerity extremely seductive”

In Suzanne’s interview with Leonard Cohen from 1992 (part 1 of 3), Suzanne Vega and Leonard Cohen discussed, along with many other topics (e.g., Howard Stern, Christmas gifts, politeness, the superior stylishness of wine and water compared to coke and orange juice), songs from Vega’s 99.9 album that had then just been released.

One of the songs with which Cohen is clearly taken is “If You Were (In My Movie):”

Cohen: If You Were In My Movie , in that song you seem to indicate that you would give wide allowance to anyown you fall in love with.

Vega: I don’t know if that’s true, maybe, probably. I don’t know.

Cohen: Is that what the song is about?

Vega: The song is about flirting. It’s a flirting kind of song. It’s a song looking at another person and saying these are qualities that you could be, that you could have within you. These are the things that I see.

Cohen: You could realize these things with me.

Vega: Yeah, if you wanted to. It’s putting a glamorous light on someone’s character. Saying these are the things that, when I look at you, these are the things I see. It’s like taking someone’s basic nature and making it more than it actually is.

Cohen: You have managed to make austerity extremely seductive. There is a very seductive quality about your record, although nothing is given away, nothing is thrown away, nothing is revealed.

Suzanne Vega – If You Were (In My Movie)
Video from haramist

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Credit Due Department: Davido at LeonardCohenForum alerted me to Leonard Cohen’s favorable comments about Suzanne Vega’s songs made in the referenced interview.

Note: Originally posted June 15, 2010 at 1HeckOfAGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric

Jay-Z’s “99 Problems” Is On Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox

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Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox

Biggest Influence on My Music – The jukebox. I lived beside jukeboxes all through the fifties. … I never knew who was singing. I never followed things that way. I still don’t. I wasn’t a student of music; I was a student of the restaurant I was in — and the waitresses. The music was a part of it. I knew what number the song was.

– Leonard Cohen (Yakety Yak by Scott Cohen, 1994)

Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox: Over the years, Leonard Cohen has mentioned a number of specific songs he favors. Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox is a Cohencentric feature that began collecting these tunes for the edification and entertainment of viewers on April 4, 2009. All posts in the Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox series can be found at The Original Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox Page.

“I’ve got 99 problems, but a bitch ain’t one”

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As part of the promotion of the Old Ideas album, Leonard Cohen was interviewed by Pierre Siankowski for Les Inrockuptibles.

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The pertinent excerpt from Leonard Cohen: Éternel Contemporain, published February 8, 2012, follows:

When I mention Tom Waits, Cohen’s eyes light up. “Tom is a friend, a wonderful man. I listen to his records very often they are part of my life. I am glad that my music can evoke his own. “He also quotes his friend poet Irving Layton, died in 2006, as its fundamental inspiration.” I keep reading his books since his disappearance, he is one of the sources of the latter disk. “Cohen does not preclude a subsequent tour.” I must find the necessary fuel. This may be the wine. “

And rap in all this? Jay-Z is it part of the life of Leonard Cohen? He stops, stares at me in the eye and, in his inimitable voice, launches the punchline of the legendary boss of hip-hop world:

I got 99 problems
but a bitch ain’t one

Leonard Cohen is 77. Our brief interview stops on the TKO incredibly soft, it promises a longer, maybe one day: “I’m still young, we have time.” [Google English translation; my emphasis]

 

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Credit Due Department: Roman Gavrilin aka Hermitage Prisoner alerted me to Leonard Cohen’s quotation of Jay-Z’s lyrics in the Les Inrockuptibles interview. Les Inrockuptibles cover contributed by Dominique BOILE.

Note: Originally posted Feb 13, 2012 at 1HeckOfAGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric

Bell & Arc’s Cover Of “So Long, Marianne” Is On Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox

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Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox

Biggest Influence on My Music – The jukebox. I lived beside jukeboxes all through the fifties. … I never knew who was singing. I never followed things that way. I still don’t. I wasn’t a student of music; I was a student of the restaurant I was in — and the waitresses. The music was a part of it. I knew what number the song was.

– Leonard Cohen (Yakety Yak by Scott Cohen, 1994)

Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox: Over the years, Leonard Cohen has mentioned a number of specific songs he favors. Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox is a Cohencentric feature that began collecting these tunes for the edification and entertainment of viewers on April 4, 2009. All posts in the Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox series can be found at The Original Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox Page.

Leonard Cohen Sends A Message To Bell & Arc

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These Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox pieces typically begin with the evidence that Mr Cohen did indeed admire the featured song. This is the first case in which that evidence is in the form of an ad that ran in 1971.

bellarc2 Continue Reading →

Patsy Cline’s "I Fall To Pieces" Is On Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox

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Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox

Biggest Influence on My Music – The jukebox. I lived beside jukeboxes all through the fifties. … I never knew who was singing. I never followed things that way. I still don’t. I wasn’t a student of music; I was a student of the restaurant I was in — and the waitresses. The music was a part of it. I knew what number the song was.

– Leonard Cohen (Yakety Yak by Scott Cohen, 1994)

Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox: Over the years, Leonard Cohen has mentioned a number of specific songs he favors. Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox is a Cohencentric feature that began collecting these tunes for the edification and entertainment of viewers on April 4, 2009. All posts in the Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox series can be found at The Original Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox Page.

Patsy_Cline_-_I_Fall_to_Pieces

Patsy Cline’s Country Classic On Leonard Cohen’s Hit List

Patsy-Cline-Coal-Miners-Daugh-466342Patsy Cline’s “I Fall To Pieces” is #10 on Leonard Cohen’s Top Ten Songs of 1988, a listing found in “Leonard Cohen – In Eigenen Worten” (In His Own Words) by Jim Devlin.

Patsy Cline – I Fall To Pieces

 

Credit Due Department: Florian earns a tip of the Heck Of A Guy fedora for submitting the reference from “Leonard Cohen – In Eigenen Worten” (In His Own Words) by Jim Devlin, which included Leonard Cohen’s Top Ten songs of 1988.1 Patsy Cline photo By Decca Record, Public Domain via Wikipedia

Note: Originally posted Mar 19, 2010 at 1HeckOfAGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric

  1. Of the several members of LeonardCohenForum who responded to my request for help in finding instances of Leonard Cohen favoring a specific song performed by a specific artist, Florian was far and away the most prolific. []

“Gloomy Sunday” Is On Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox

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Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox

Biggest Influence on My Music – The jukebox. I lived beside jukeboxes all through the fifties. … I never knew who was singing. I never followed things that way. I still don’t. I wasn’t a student of music; I was a student of the restaurant I was in — and the waitresses. The music was a part of it. I knew what number the song was.

– Leonard Cohen (Yakety Yak by Scott Cohen, 1994)

Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox: Over the years, Leonard Cohen has mentioned a number of specific songs he favors. Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox is a Cohencentric feature that began collecting these tunes for the edification and entertainment of viewers on April 4, 2009. All posts in the Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox series can be found at The Original Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox Page.

Gloomy Sunday & Dress Rehearsal Rag: Legendary Suicide-Inducing Songs

Leonard Cohen’s introduction to “Dress Rehearsal Rag” at the 1968 BBC Sessions follows:1

You know there’s a song in, I think it was in Czechoslovakia, called “Gloomy Sunday” that was forbidden to play because every time it would play people would leap out of windows and off of roofs. It was a tragic song. And I read in the Athens News the other day that the composer of it, who only really wrote that one song, he died recently, jumped out of a window himself. I have one of those songs that I have banned for myself. I sing it only on extremely joyous occasions when I know that the landscape can support the despair that I am about to project into it. It’s called the “Dress Rehearsal Rag.”

That introduction and the 1968 recording of “Dress Rehearsal Rag” can be heard in this video from messalina79:

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  1. Found at Diamonds In The Lines: Leonard Cohen in his own live words []

“The Future’s So Bright, I Gotta Wear Shades” By Timbuk3 Is On Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox

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Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox

Biggest Influence on My Music – The jukebox. I lived beside jukeboxes all through the fifties. … I never knew who was singing. I never followed things that way. I still don’t. I wasn’t a student of music; I was a student of the restaurant I was in — and the waitresses. The music was a part of it. I knew what number the song was.

– Leonard Cohen (Yakety Yak by Scott Cohen, 1994)

Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox: Over the years, Leonard Cohen has mentioned a number of specific songs he favors. Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox is a Cohencentric feature that began collecting these tunes for the edification and entertainment of viewers on April 4, 2009. All posts in the Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox series can be found at The Original Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox Page.

“The Future’s So Bright, I Gotta Wear Shades” By Timbuk3

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The following excerpt is from Lenny Plays It Cool by Bud Scoppa (Music Connection: April 6-19, 1987):

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Timbuk3, the husband and wife team of Pat MacDonald and Barbara K. MacDonald, released “The Future’s So Bright, I Gotta Wear Shades” on their first album, Greetings from Timbuk3 (1986). The song rose to #19 on the Billboard Hot 100 and #14 on Billboard Mainstream Rock and has been on numerous movie and television soundtracks.

Timbuk 3 -The Future’s So Bright Official Video

 

The Future’s So Bright, Leonard Cohen Has To Wear Shades

Timbuk3’s hit also serves as the soundtrack for another video; see Leonard Cohen’s 1987 Prequel To DrHGuy’s 2013 “50 Shades of Leonard Cohen” Video

Note: Originally posted Nov 19, 2014 at 1HeckOfAGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric

“Concierto de Aranjuez” by Joaquín Rodrigo Is On Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox

jukebox700

Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox

Biggest Influence on My Music – The jukebox. I lived beside jukeboxes all through the fifties. … I never knew who was singing. I never followed things that way. I still don’t. I wasn’t a student of music; I was a student of the restaurant I was in — and the waitresses. The music was a part of it. I knew what number the song was.

– Leonard Cohen (Yakety Yak by Scott Cohen, 1994)

Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox: Over the years, Leonard Cohen has mentioned a number of specific songs he favors. Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox is a Cohencentric feature that began collecting these tunes for the edification and entertainment of viewers on April 4, 2009. All posts in the Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox series can be found at The Original Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox Page.

A New Sound For Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox – Orchestra & Classical Spanish Guitar

Joaquin_Rodrigo_en_Rosario Continue Reading →

Geoffrey Oreyama’s Cover Of "Suzanne" Is On Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox

jukebox700

Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox

Biggest Influence on My Music – The jukebox. I lived beside jukeboxes all through the fifties. … I never knew who was singing. I never followed things that way. I still don’t. I wasn’t a student of music; I was a student of the restaurant I was in — and the waitresses. The music was a part of it. I knew what number the song was.

– Leonard Cohen (Yakety Yak by Scott Cohen, 1994)

Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox: Over the years, Leonard Cohen has mentioned a number of specific songs he favors. Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox is a Cohencentric feature that began collecting these tunes for the edification and entertainment of viewers on April 4, 2009. All posts in the Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox series can be found at The Original Leonard Cohen’s Jukebox Page.

Suzanne Cover Gives Leonard Cohen A Good Feeling

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This excerpt from Porridge? Lozenge? Syringe? by Adrian Deevoy (The Q Magazine, 1991), describes a conversation taking place between the author and Cohen while music from the tribute album, I’m Your Fan, plays in the background:

As That Petrol Emotion launch into Stories Of The Street, he [Leonard Cohen] finally cracks. “Hey, we’re really going to have to take this down. It’s such an exquisite distraction.” He turns the volume right down. “We’ll try it as background music, although my guess is that it’ll make it more tantalising.” All goes swimmingly until the opening phrases of Suzanne stop Cohen in his tracks. “Who’s singing this?” he asks.

It is Geoffrey Oreyama, who is signed to Peter Gabriel’s Real World label. Cohen squints toward the hi-fi.

“When you hear a guy singing a song like this, which you wrote before he was born, it gives you a good feeling.” He is genuinely choked with emotion. He takes a deep breath. “This isn’t a casual moment for me.”

Oreyama is an Ugandan musician who sings in Swahili and Acholi as well as French and English.

The Video

The audio track of this video is, indeed, Geoffrey Oreyama’s cover of Leonard Cohen’s “Suzanne” from the I’m Your Fan album. The video, however, consists of scenes from Final Fantasy.1 I have no information about and am unwilling to even speculate on Leonard Cohen’s assessment of Final Fantasy.

Note: Originally posted Jan 1, 2010 at 1HeckOfAGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric

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  1. Wikipedia provides this description of Final Fantasy: Final Fantasy is a media franchise created by Hironobu Sakaguchi, and is developed and owned by Square Enix (formerly Squaresoft). The franchise centers on a series of fantasy and science-fantasy console role-playing games (RPGs), but includes motion pictures, anime, printed media, and other merchandise. The series began in 1987 as an eponymous video game developed to save Square from bankruptcy; the game was a success and spawned sequels. The video game series has since branched into other genres such as tactical role-playing, massively multiplayer online role-playing, and racing. Although most Final Fantasy installments are independent stories with various different settings and main characters, they feature common elements that define the franchise. Such recurring elements include plot themes, character names, and game mechanics. Plots center on a group of heroes battling a great evil while exploring the characters’ internal struggles and relationships. Character names are often derived from the history, languages, and mythologies of cultures worldwide. The series has been commercially and critically successful; it is Square Enix’s best selling video game franchise, with more than 85 million units sold, and one of the best-selling video game franchises. Second to Final Fantasy among Square Enix franchises is Dragon Quest. It was awarded a star on the Walk of Game in 2006, and holds seven Guinness World Records in the Guinness World Records Gamer’s Edition 2008. The series is well known for its innovation, visuals, and music, such as the inclusion of full motion videos, photo-realistic character models, and orchestrated music by Nobuo Uematsu. Final Fantasy has been a driving force in the video game industry. The video game series has affected Square’s business practices and its relationships with other video game developers. It has also introduced many features now common in console RPGs and has been credited with helping to popularize RPGs in markets outside Japan. []