“I wrote these songs to myself and to women several years ago and it is a curious thing to be trapped in that original effort, because here I wanted to tell one person one thing and now I am in the situation where I must repeat them like some parrot chained to his stand, night after night.” Leonard Cohen (1972)

quoteup2
It is not just the observance and the documentation and the record of a few museum songs. After all I wrote these songs to myself and to women several years ago and it is a curious thing to be trapped in that original effort, because here I wanted to tell one person one thing and now I am in the situation where I must repeat them like some parrot chained to his stand, night after night.quotedown2

Leonard Cohen

 

From Bird On A Wire documentary (1974). This photo was taken by and posted with permission of Lars Sandblom.

“Sometimes I can’t stand the sound of my voice. It went through periods.” Leonard Cohen On His Voice

quoteup2
Sometimes I can’t stand the sound of my voice. It went through periods. The first and second records it sounded right. Then I stopped being able to find the right voice for the songs. The songs were good and the intention was good but the voice wasn’t really up to it. I lost it for a while. When I did Various Positions (1985) it was coming back and when I got to I’m Your Man (1988) I was in full stridequotedown2

Leonard Cohen

Adrian Deevoy, Porridge? Lozenge? Syringe?, The Q Magazine 1991. Accessed at LeonardCohenFiles. Photo by Ted McDonnell.

“As far as I can see this is my last tour” Leonard Cohen 1972

quoteup2
As far as I can see this is my last tour. But the will is frail and I may fall back and it might take 10 more tours to finally quit, or this might be it.quotedown2

Leonard Cohen

From Famous Last Words from Leonard Cohen by Paul Saltzman. Maclean’s: June 1972. Originally posted Jun 25, 2012 at DrHGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric

“I don’t know if we were any good that night, but somehow the hospitality of the audience was such that they awarded me the highest designation of the heart.” Leonard Cohen Names 1988 Seville Show His “All Time Most Complete Performance”

 

Can you think of your all time most complete performance?

quoteup2
One of the happiest & most heartfelt moments was at a [1988] concert in Seville. The audience began waving white handkerchiefs and chanting, ‘Torero.’ I don’t know if we were any good that night, but somehow the hospitality of the audience was such that they awarded me the highest designation of the heart.quotedown2

Leonard Cohen

 

From Leonard Cohen — Haute Dog by Mr. Bonzai (David Goggin). Music Smarts: July 10, 2010 (archived from 1988). Leonard Cohen played Seville on May 22, 1988. Note: Originally posted October 19, 2014 at DrHGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric

 

The presence of Leonard Cohen was, along with Frank Zappa and Joe Cocker at the peak of his popularity, the great attraction of the Cita in Seville of 1988, that festival that organized the City council of Seville before in the eighties and that brought to The city to names of the stature of James Brown or BB King, just to mention two of them. It was his only performance in Seville.

The Canadian, who died on Thursday at age 82, also went to the city with one of the best albums of his entire career under his belt: “I’m Your Man” (1988), responsible for a reinvention, via synthesizers And boxes of rhythm, which renewed its sound and returned it to the lists of successes, even in Spain.

The concert in Seville, however, was a public failure, as happened years before with The Kinks, which resulted in millionaire losses for the promoter, although Leonard Cohen offered a good concert accompanied by a solid band and the two chorus players Seconded at that time in which lay the basis of the style of maturity that would accompany him until his death.

The date of the concert was Sunday May 22 and the price of tickets was 1,000 pesetas (6 euros). It was held in the auditorium of Prado de San Sebastián, the usual place of the Cita’s performances in Seville, and in the concert the Canadian composer reviewed some of his recent songs, such as the hit “First we take Manhattan”, along with classics Of his repertoire, such as “Bird on the wire”, “Hallelujah” and “Suzanne”.

La única vez que Leonard Cohen actuó en Sevilla by JesÚs Morillo (ABC: 11/11/2016)

“You want to hear a guy’s story… when you hear Fats Domino singing, ‘I found my thrill on Blueberry Hill,’ whatever that’s about, I mean, it’s deep.” Leonard Cohen

quoteup2
You want to hear a guy’s story, and if the guy’s really seen a few things, the story is quite interesting. Or even if he comes to the point where he wants to sing about the moon in June, there’s something in his voice … when you hear Fats Domino singing, ‘I found my thrill on Blueberry Hill,’ whatever that’s about, I mean, it’s deep.quotedown2

Leonard Cohen

 

Leonard Cohen’s Nervous Breakthrough by Mark Rowland, Musician, July 1988.

John Hammond: “You got it, Leonard.” Leonard Cohen: “I didn’t quite know whether he meant a contract or the ‘gift,’ but it certainly made me feel very good.”

quoteup2
I sang him [John Hammond] six or seven songs. He didn’t say anything between them. At the end of those six or seven songs, he said, “You got it, Leonard.” I didn’t quite know whether he meant a contract, or the ‘gift,’ but it certainly made me feel very good.quotedown2

Leonard Cohen 1967

 

From The John Hammond Years: Interview with John Hammond & Leonard Cohen broadcast on BBC, Sept 20, 1986. Accessed at LeonardCohenFiles.Photo Credit: York University Libraries, Clara Thomas Archives & Special Collections, Toronto Telegram fonds, F0433, Photographer: John Sharp: ASC01709.

DrHGuy Note: At the time, John Hammond was Columbia Records’ leading artist and repertory executive, having discovered and signed Billie Holiday, Count Basie, Aretha Franklin, and Bob Dylan. Hammond would later sign Bruce Springsteen to a recording contract. He also, of course, signed Leonard to Columbia Records, which would be his record label, except for Death Of A Ladies’ Man (Warner Brothers) and Various Positions, which Columbia initially rejected and was subsequently picked up by the independent label Passport Records (the album was finally included in the catalog in 1990 when Columbia released the Cohen discography on compact disc) for the rest of his life.

Note: Originally posted March 28, 2013 at DrHGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric