“I like [Phil Spector’s] voice, he has a beautiful urgent voice. I wouldn’t mind being his Bernie Taupin.” Leonard Cohen 1977

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The Great Ones Never Leave. They Just Sit It Out Once In A While by Harvey Kubernik. Melody Maker: November 26, 1977. Originally posted Jan 31, 2014 at DrHGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric

Leonard Cohen – Another Brick In Phil Spector’s Crumbling Wall Of Sound?

In his essay, True Love Leaves No Traces (Mas Context: Fall 2013), Daniel Luis Martinez examines the significance of the Wall Of Sound as an architectural metaphor and the dissolution of Spector’s musical construct, using instances from Death of a Ladies Man, the 1977 Leonard Cohen-Phil Spector collaboration. A representative excerpt follows:

There is evidence of the Wall of Sound’s dissipation at the very beginning of the album in the aptly titled, “True Love Leaves No Traces.” Based on one of Cohen’s poems, the song itself is a series of repetitions (intro/ verse/ chorus/ intro/ verse/ chorus, etc), dramatized by Spector’s decision to use a protracted fadeout. Hang in there long enough and the song’s cyclical structure is revealed as you hear the faint start of a third chorus. It’s as if you’ve been invited to hear four minutes and twenty-five seconds of an endless loop.

True Love Leaves No Traces (illustrated with images from Dominique BOILE’s private collection) is an insightful and enlightening essay that rewards careful reading. The complete article can be found at the link.

Originally posted October 4, 2013 at DrHGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric

“The genius of Phil [Spector] is to completely exhaust everyone and call on some special reserve that no one expects to locate and to manifest it.” Leonard Cohen

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The genius of Phil is to completely exhaust everyone and call on some special reserve that no one expects to locate and to manifest it. That is how he get the incredible energy. He frustrates the musicians for hours, refusing to let them play more than one or two bars, and then he lets them play.quotedown2

Leonard Cohen

 

From Leonard Cohen: My album will be classic in 10 years by Mary Campbell. AP: Feb 1978.

Leonard Cohen Collaborates With Phil Spector & Taunts Phil’s Bodyguard, “You’re a motherfucking pussycat. You don’t even know how to use that [gun]”

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From Leonard Cohen by John Walsh (MOJO: Sept 1994). Originally posted at DrHGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric

“[Phil Spector] is very nice but he pretends to be violent. He kept a lot of guns around and armed bodyguards; bullets and wine bottles littered the floor…A pretty dangerous situation.” Leonard Cohen

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I knew his [Spector’s] songs, I liked his work a lot. But I didn’t know what it was to work with him in the studio! He had come to one of my concerts here in Los Angeles at the Troubadour. After the concert, Phil invited us to his house. The house was freezing because of the air conditioning; it was four degrees. He locked the door so we couldn’t leave. I said ‘Listen Phil, if you lock us in here, we are going to get bored… So as long as we are locked up we might as well write some songs together.’ So we started that very night. We wrote songs together for about a month, it was fun. Phil is really a charming guy when you are with him alone. I would write the words, then he would work on the melody, then I would revise the words to better fit the melody. We would exchange ideas. But in the studio when other people were around he was a totally different man. He is very nice but he pretends to be violent. He kept a lot of guns around and armed bodyguards; bullets and wine bottles littered the floor…A pretty dangerous situation. I wouldn’t say Phil is someone lovable, but he wasn’t mean – except once when he pointed a gun to my throat and then cocked it. He said ‘I love you Leonard.’ I responded ‘I hope you love me Phil.’ (laughs)… Once in the studio he pointed a revolver at the violinist who then packed up his violin and ran out (laughs)… But it was a bad time for Phil too. My mother was dying of leukemia, I was constantly going between Montreal and Los Angeles…quotedown2

Leonard Cohen

From Comme Un Guerrier by Christian Fevret (Les Inrocks: Aug 21, 1991). Via Google Translate. Originally posted Feb 22, 2013 at DrHGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric

More Posts About the Leonard Cohen Phil Spector Collaboration

Leonard Cohen Explains Why Phil Spector’s Death Of A Ladies’ Man Recording Sessions Lasted Until Early Morning Hours

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Phil [Spector] would make his opinions on LA football teams clear to everyone, taking a couple of hours. His analysis of the basketball situation in North America took hours every night and he talked about his devotion to laws that let us carry firearms.quotedown2

Leonard Cohen

 

From Leonard Cohen: My album will be classic in 10 years By Mary Campbell. AP: Feb 1978. Originally posted August 3, 2016 at DrHGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric

“I’m very fond of Phil Spector…he’s one of the great, magnificent figures…It’s just that I don’t have much of an appetite for magnificence” Leonard Cohen

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I’m very fond of Phil Spector. I think he’s one of the great, magnificent figures on the landscape. It’s just that I don’t have much of an appetite for magnificencequotedown2

Leonard Cohen

From Love Me, Love My Gun Barrel by Graham Lock. New Musical Express: February 23, 1980. Originally June 21, 2013 posted at DrHGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric

“Fingerprints has hand clapping on it. The clappers are not merely people with hands.”Leonard Cohen On High Production Cost Of Death Of A Ladies’ Man

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Fingerprints has hand clapping on it. The clappers are not merely people with hands. They’re the highest-priced musicians in L.A., on double time and after midnight on quadruple time. Everything took place after midnight.quotedown2

Leonard Cohen

 

From Leonard Cohen: My Album Will Be Classic In 10 Years by Mary Campbell. AP: Feb 1978.