“I hope that the final effect is one of invigoration rather than suffocation” Leonard Cohen on You Want It Darker – Released One Year Ago: Oct 21, 2016

From Adam Cohen à la rescousse by Alain de Repentigny [From original English questionnaire forwarded to me by Leonard Cohen] (La Presse: Oct 19, 2016).

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Information about You Want It Darker by Leonard Cohen, including reviews like this, is collected and updated at Info & Updates: Leonard Cohen’s You Want It Darker

“I never try to baffle or mystify [with my songs] although I can understand that with the habit of literal reading that is taught in schools it is sometimes difficult to enjoy the work.” Leonard Cohen

From Have You Heard The One About Lenny In The Sandwich Bar? by Andrew Tyler. Disc: September 2, 1972. Originally posted October 14, 2013 at DrHGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric

Leonard Cohen Employs Sergio Leone, Motown, Bubble Gum For A “Different Twist” On First We Take Manhattan

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Without that Sergio Leone-Eastwood track it would have been truly demented geopolitical fantasy. But with that soundtrack and with the Motown chorus veering over to bubble gum, you get a different twist on the thingquotedown2

Leonard Cohen

Folk-Rock’s Poet Laureate Returns By Jeff Bradley. AP story, printed in Times Daily – Sept 3, 1988. Originally posted Nov 13, 2014 at DrHGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric

“Writing [Suzanne] was a sheer act of desperation — of a desperado” Leonard Cohen


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Had I not written ‘Suzanne’ presumably I would be broke and starving, as I was then. At thirty-two or thirty-four, whichever I was when I wrote it, I couldn’t pay my grocery bills, I couldn’t pay the rent, and I had a woman and child to support. Writing that song was a sheer act of desperation — of a desperado.quotedown2

Leonard Cohen

From “Yakety Yak” by Scott Cohen (1994). Originally posted Dec 2, 2014 at DrHGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric

“The kind of thing I like is that you write a song, and it slips into the world, and they forget who wrote it” Leonard Cohen


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The kind of thing I like is that you write a song, and it slips into the world, and they forget who wrote it. And it moves and it changes, and you hear it again three hundred years later, some women washing their clothes in a stream, and one of them is humming this tune.quotedown2

Leonard Cohen

 

From Leonard Cohen Unplugged By Pico Iyer (Buzz: April 1998). Accessed at LeonardCohenFiles. Photo by Johann Agust Hansen. Originally posted Nov 12, 2014 at DrHGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric

Leonard Cohen on “Famous Blue Raincoat” & “Bird On The Wire” as unfinished songs & why he released them anyway

Interviewer: What about “Famous Blue Raincoat?”

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That was written on Clinton Street. I never felt I really sealed that song; I never felt the carpentry was finished. That song and ‘Bird on the Wire’ were two songs I never successfully finished, but they were good enough to be used. Also, with the poverty of songs I have for each record, I can’t afford to discard one as good as that. It’s one of the better tunes I’ve written, but lyrically it’s too mysterious, too unclear.quotedown2

Leonard Cohen

 

Note: View photos of Leonard Cohen’s Clinton Street digs and surroundings at “New York is cold, but I like where I’m living” The View From Leonard Cohen’s 1960s NYC Apartment

Sincerely, L. Cohen by Brian Cullman (Details for Men, January, 1993). Originally posted Oct 10, 2014 at DrHGuy.com, a predecessor of Cohencentric